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Artaxerxes

Classical Opera

Artaxerxes

...a delightful performance
CKD 358 (Linn Records)
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$29.00

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FLAC 24bit 88.2kHz 2,315.8MB $31.00

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FLAC 16bit 44.1kHz 598.9MB $17.00

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Tracks: Listen and Download

Format
Track Time Listen Track Price
1
Overture (Poco piu che andante – Larghetto – Gavotta)

Overture (Poco piu che andante – Larghetto – Gavotta)

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
05:13 Play $3.40
2
Recitative: Still silence reigns around

Recitative: Still silence reigns around

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:29 Play $1.70
3
No.1, Duettino: Fair Aurora, prithee stay

No.1, Duettino: Fair Aurora, prithee stay

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:16 Play $1.70
4
Recitative: Alas, thou know’st that for my love to thee

Recitative: Alas, thou know’st that for my love to thee

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:13 Play $1.70
5
No.2, Air: Adieu, thou lovely youth

No.2, Air: Adieu, thou lovely youth

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:21 Play $1.70
6
Recitative: O cruel parting! How can I survive?

Recitative: O cruel parting! How can I survive?

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:57 Play $1.70
7
No.3, Air: Amid a thousand racking woes

No.3, Air: Amid a thousand racking woes

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
04:38 Play $1.70
8
Recitative: Be firm, my heart

Recitative: Be firm, my heart

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:26 Play $1.70
9
No.4, Air: Behold, on Lethe’s dismal strand

No.4, Air: Behold, on Lethe’s dismal strand

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:36 Play $1.70
10
Recitative: Stay, Artaxerxes, stay

Recitative: Stay, Artaxerxes, stay

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:29 Play $1.70
11
No.5, Air: Fair Semira, lovely maid

No.5, Air: Fair Semira, lovely maid

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:26 Play $1.70
12
Recitative: I fear some dread disaster...

Recitative: I fear some dread disaster...

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:29 Play $1.70
13
No.6, Air: When real joy we miss

No.6, Air: When real joy we miss

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
01:59 Play $1.70
14
Recitative: Ye Gods, protectors of the Persian Empire

Recitative: Ye Gods, protectors of the Persian Empire

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:36 Play $1.70
15
No.7, Air: How hard is the fate

No.7, Air: How hard is the fate

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
04:01 Play $1.70
16
Recitative: Whither do I fly?

Recitative: Whither do I fly?

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
03:23 Play $1.70
17
No.8, Air: Thy father! Away, I renounce the soft claim

No.8, Air: Thy father! Away, I renounce the soft claim

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
01:23 Play $1.70
18
Recitative: Ye cruel Gods, what crime have I committed

Recitative: Ye cruel Gods, what crime have I committed

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:14 Play $1.70
19
No.9, Air: Acquit thee of this foul offence

No.9, Air: Acquit thee of this foul offence

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
01:27 Play $1.70
20
Recitative: Appearance, I must own, is strong against me

Recitative: Appearance, I must own, is strong against me

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:48 Play $1.70
21
No.10, Air: O too lovely, too unkind

No.10, Air: O too lovely, too unkind

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
04:24 Play $1.70
22
Accompanied recitative: Dear and beloved shade

Accompanied recitative: Dear and beloved shade

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:48 Play $1.70
23
No.11, Air: Fly, soft ideas, fly

No.11, Air: Fly, soft ideas, fly

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
05:01 Play $3.40
24
Recitative: Guards, speed ye to the tower

Recitative: Guards, speed ye to the tower

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:37 Play $1.70
25
No.12, Air: In infancy, our hopes and fears

No.12, Air: In infancy, our hopes and fears

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:12 Play $1.70
26
Recitative: So far my great resolve succeeds

Recitative: So far my great resolve succeeds

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:28 Play $1.70
27
No.13, Air: Disdainful you fly me

No.13, Air: Disdainful you fly me

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:46 Play $1.70
28
Recitative: Why, my dear friend, so pensive, so inactive?

Recitative: Why, my dear friend, so pensive, so inactive?

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
02:05 Play $1.70
29
No.14, Air: To sigh and complain

No.14, Air: To sigh and complain

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
01:51 Play $1.70
30
Recitative: How many links to dire misfortune’s chain

Recitative: How many links to dire misfortune’s chain

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:12 Play $1.70
31
No.15, Air: If o’er the cruel tyrant love

No.15, Air: If o’er the cruel tyrant love

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:00 Play $1.70
32
Recitative: Which fatal evil shall I first oppose?

Recitative: Which fatal evil shall I first oppose?

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:31 Play $1.70
33
No.16, Air: If the river’s swelling waves

No.16, Air: If the river’s swelling waves

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:34 Play $1.70
34
Recitative: Ye solid pillars of the Persian Empire

Recitative: Ye solid pillars of the Persian Empire

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
05:00 Play $3.40
35
No.17, Air: By that belov’d embrace

No.17, Air: By that belov’d embrace

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:31 Play $1.70
36
Recitative: Ah me, at poor Arbaces’ parting

Recitative: Ah me, at poor Arbaces’ parting

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:46 Play $1.70
37
No.18, Air: Monster, away

No.18, Air: Monster, away

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:36 Play $1.70
38
Recitative: See, lov’d Semira

Recitative: See, lov’d Semira

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:02 Play $1.70
39
Accompanied recitative: At last my soul has room

Accompanied recitative: At last my soul has room

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
00:37 Play $1.70
40
No.19, Air: Thou, like the glorious sun

No.19, Air: Thou, like the glorious sun

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
04:58 Play $1.70
41
No.20, Air: Why is death for ever late

No.20, Air: Why is death for ever late

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:57 Play $1.70
42
Recitative: Arbaces! Gracious Heav’n, what’s this I see?

Recitative: Arbaces! Gracious Heav’n, what’s this I see?

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:13 Play $1.70
43
No.21, Air: Water parted from the sea

No.21, Air: Water parted from the sea

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:19 Play $1.70
44
Recitative: That face, secure in conscious innocence

Recitative: That face, secure in conscious innocence

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:25 Play $1.70
45
No.22, Air: Though oft a cloud with envious shade

No.22, Air: Though oft a cloud with envious shade

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:38 Play $1.70
46
Recitative: My son, Arbaces... where art thou retir’d?

Recitative: My son, Arbaces... where art thou retir’d?

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:52 Play $1.70
47
No.23, Air: O let the danger of a son

No.23, Air: O let the danger of a son

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
02:15 Play $1.70
48
Accompanied recitative: Ye adverse Gods!

Accompanied recitative: Ye adverse Gods!

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:41 Play $1.70
49
No.24, Air: O, much lov’d son, if death

No.24, Air: O, much lov’d son, if death

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
05:15 Play $3.40
50
Recitative: Perhaps the King releas’d Arbaces

Recitative: Perhaps the King releas’d Arbaces

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:34 Play $1.70
51
No.25, Air: Let not rage, thy bosom firing

No.25, Air: Let not rage, thy bosom firing

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
04:24 Play $1.70
52
Recitative: What have I done? Alas, I vainly thought

Recitative: What have I done? Alas, I vainly thought

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
00:24 Play $1.70
53
No.26, Air: ’Tis not true that in our grief

No.26, Air: ’Tis not true that in our grief

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
04:08 Play $1.70
54
Recitative: Nor here my searching eyes can find Mandane

Recitative: Nor here my searching eyes can find Mandane

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
01:20 Play $1.70
55
No.27, Duetto: For thee I live, my dearest

No.27, Duetto: For thee I live, my dearest

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:37 Play $1.70
56
Recitative: To you, my people, much belov’d

Recitative: To you, my people, much belov’d

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
02:20 Play $1.70
57
No.28, Air: The soldier, tir’d of war’s alarms

No.28, Air: The soldier, tir’d of war’s alarms

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
03:33 Play $1.70
58
Recitative: Behold, my King, Arbaces at thy feet

Recitative: Behold, my King, Arbaces at thy feet

Composer Thomas Arne
Conductor Ian Page
Arranger Ian Page
02:25 Play $1.70
59
No.29, Finale: Live to us, to Empire live

No.29, Finale: Live to us, to Empire live

Composer Duncan Druce
Conductor Ian Page
03:36 Play $1.70
Total Running Time 137 minutes Purchase all tracks 
$17.00 
Prices shown in US Dollars

The Classical Opera Company, directed by Ian Page, give a wonderful performance of Thomas Arne's Artaxerxes. Recorded following their acclaimed performance of the opera in 2009, this features the exciting vocal talents of several world-class young artists.

The SACD layer is both 5.1 channel and 2-channel. The Studio Master files are 192 kHz or 88.2kHz / 24-bit.

Download includes - cover art, inlay, booklet

Released to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Thomas Arne, the composer of Rule, Britannia!, The Classical Opera Company presents the first complete recording of Artaxerxes. The original scores for the opera were burned in a fire in Drury Lane Theatre - only the orchestral parts and the libretto, and some of the music survived. Noted musicologist Duncan Druce recreated the Finale and the Company's director Ian Page the recitatives for this, the new performing edition, which was premiered at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, in 2009. The opera contains several well-known arias, including 'The soldier tir'd', made famous by the late Joan Sutherland.

The Classical Opera Company, which was founded by Ian Page in 1997, specialises in the music of Mozart and his contemporaries whilst performing with its own period-instrument orchestra. The Classical Opera Company has also established an outstanding track-record for its work in discovering and developing world-class young artists. Listen to the soloists in Artaxerxes (Christopher Ainslie, Elizabeth Watts, Caitlin Hulcup, Andrew Staples, Rebecca Bottone and Daniel Norman) to hear why The Classical Opera Company is regarded as one of Britain's most exciting and highly regarded young arts organisations.

'Inspired singing.' THE GUARDIAN

'All credit to the Classical Opera Company for resurrecting a work brimming with delightful music.' EVENING STANDARD

   

Booklet Notes:

The life of Thomas Arne was inextricably linked with Covent Garden. He was born just off the famous piazza, on King Street, on 12 March 1710, and died, a week before his sixty-eighth birthday, in Bow Street. Nowadays a street named in the composer's honour is situated within a minute's walk of the Royal Opera House, just off Long Acre.

Arne's greatest opera, Artaxerxes, was premiered at the Theatre Royal, the predecessor of the Royal Opera House, on 2 February 1762, and remained in the Covent Garden repertory until the late 1830s, receiving a documented one hundred and eleven performances before 1790. The young Mozart almost certainly attended a performance when he came to London in the mid 1760s, and Haydn was also acquainted with the work, enthusiastically exclaiming that he 'had no idea we had such an opera in the English language'.

The main reason for the work's subsequent neglect is a good one: the manuscript and all the original performance materials were burnt in the disastrous fire which destroyed the Theatre Royal in 1808. The opera's overture, arias and duets had already been published, and so survive intact, as does the libretto, but none of the recitatives or the finale were printed, and they are therefore lost. This recording of Artaxerxes was made following a new production of the opera at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in November 2009. To create a complete version of the work for this production I wrote new recitatives, and commissioned the musicologist, composer and baroque violinist Duncan Druce to create a new finale in the style of Arne. These are included in this recording.

The composer
Arne's father, an upholsterer and coffin-maker, originally intended him for a career in the legal profession. With this in mind he had sent him to Eton College, but his son's determination to become a musician was unwavering (as a child he had smuggled a spinet into his bedroom and dampened the strings with a handkerchief, so that he could practice at night while the rest of the family slept), and his father eventually consented to his son's choice of profession. Arne is best known today as the composer of Rule, Britannia!, which was originally written as part of the masque Alfred, but his output was immense. His settings of Comus (1738), Alfred (1740) and The Judgement of Paris (1742) established him as the leading English theatre composer of his day, and he also enjoyed great success with the songs he wrote for Shakespeare's The Tempest, As You Like It and Twelfth Night. Soon, though, his productivity and popularity began to wane, and he was not to have another major success for nearly twenty years. Then, just as suddenly, he had three triumphs in as many years, with Thomas and Sally (1760), Artaxerxes and Love in a Village (both 1762). His greatest critical acclaim was reserved for his 1761 oratorio Judith, but this never achieved the success of Artaxerxes, whose fusion of ‘opera seria' in the Italian style sung in English proved hugely popular with singers and audiences alike.

The libretto
The bedrock of Italian ‘opera seria' throughout the middle of the eighteenth century was the prolific series of opera texts by the Italian poet and librettist Pietro Metastasio (1698-1782). Over eight hundred operas from the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries were settings of Metastasio, and his Artaserse, which was originally written in 1729 and first set by Vinci the following year, was subsequently set by over ninety composers, including Gluck (Milan, 1741) and J.C.Bach (Turin, 1760) - in both cases, incidentally, the composer's very first opera - in locations ranging from Padua to Stockholm. Arne was probably already familiar with Hasse's setting, which was performed in London in 1754.

The English translation of the libretto for Artaxerxes was published anonymously, but is known to have been the work of Arne himself. Charles Burney was rather damning of this aspect of Arne's work, writing that 'the number of his unfortunate pieces for the stage was prodigious; yet none of them were condemned or neglected for want of merit in the music, but words, of which the doctor was too frequently guilty of being the author'. In the preface to the printed libretto, the author attempts to deflect criticism by asserting that it is his "first attempt of the kind", but in truth the text is not without its merits, and generally serves the music effectively.

The first performance
Artaxerxes received its first performance on 2 February 1762, with a cast led by Charlotte Brent as Mandane and Ferdinando Tenducci as Arbaces. Charlotte Brent (1735-1802) had received a rapturous reception at her debut as Polly in The Beggar's Opera in 1759. She was not only Arne's long-standing pupil but also, since 1755, his mistress, so it is not surprising that she was given much of the opera's most virtuosic writing. The great Italian castrato, Tenducci (1735-1790) had come to London in 1758, and was to stay in Britain for almost thirty years. Unusually for a castrato he married, but his bride's family was so furious that they promptly kidnapped her and had her illustrious bridegroom thrown into prison. The young Mozart met Tenducci in London and was greatly moved by his singing.

The title role, which unusually is one of the smaller roles, was taken by another Italian castrato, Nicolò Peretti, while the three remaining roles were taken by English singers, led by John Beard (1717-1791) in the role of Artabanes. Earlier in his career Beard had worked extensively with Handel, creating roles in ten of his operas and all of his English oratorios, and by 1762 he had also become the manager of the Covent Garden theatre; it was his decision to discontinue the practice of allowing half-price entry for the third act that provoked riots during a performance of Artaxerxes, which wrecked the auditorium and caused damage worth £2,000. The cast was completed by Miss Thomas in the role of Semira and George Mattocks as Rimenes.

The music
In keeping with the Italian style on which the opera was founded, Artaxerxes is very much aria-dominated, with twenty-six of the twenty-eight surviving numbers being solo arias. And yet there are significant differences, too, most notably in the relative brevity and formal variety of the arias, which nearly all eschew the ‘da capo' form so beloved of Handel and his contemporaries. It is intriguing to note that Artaxerxes dates from the same year as Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice - that is to say, three years after Handel's death (although twenty years since his last Italian opera) and five years before Mozart's first opera - and in keeping with Gluck's masterpiece Arne's work is actually more notable for its melodic beauty and emotional directness than for its vocal pyrotechnics.

Artaxerxes is also remarkable for the richness of its scoring. Arne had been the first English composer to include clarinets in his orchestra, and he uses wind instruments with great imagination and variety throughout the opera. One of the most exquisite pieces of scoring, however, is for strings alone. In Arbaces' 'O too lovely, too unkind', violins are muted and cellos and basses pizzicato, while divided violas weave a sustained backdrop to the vocal line in a way which we might now consider to be quintessentially Mozartian. Indeed, this aria is merely the strongest of a number of suggestions throughout the score of Arne's influence on the young Mozart.

New performing edition
Modern performances of Artaxerxes have been limited by the fact that the work has not survived complete. As was customary, the full score published in 1762 had omitted all the recitatives and the finale, but the complete libretto has survived, so we do know the text of all the missing music, and even which recitatives Arne wrote with orchestral accompaniment.

Nineteenth century revivals following the Covent Garden fire of 1808 used a new version of the opera created in 1813 by Sir Henry Bishop, Covent Garden's musical director from 1810 to 1824, for which he wrote new, heavily cut recitatives and a finale. These, though, made scarcely any attempt to recreate an eighteenth century idiom, and are stylistically far removed from Arne's surviving work. This is not that surprising; Bishop would probably not have thought twice about writing in his own contemporary style, living as he did in an age when it was still rare to perform ‘old' music, and the half century that separates his work from Arne's original had witnessed not only the complete works of Mozart but also all but one of Beethoven's symphonies.

For the 2009 Royal Opera production of Artaxerxes and this recording, I composed new recitatives, including the four which Arne set with orchestral accompaniment, that are hopefully comparable to the style of the early 1760s. This was a time-consuming but not especially arduous process, as recitative was a fairly basic and standardized form which evolved little between the death of Handel and the composition of Mozart's Da Ponte operas. Considerably more skilful is Duncan Druce's new setting ‘after Arne' of the finale, complete with the duet passages prescribed in the libretto. But I'm sure I speak for Duncan as well as myself in saying that these recreations have not been undertaken with any delusions of grandeur, but merely as a means of enabling this remarkable and beautiful opera to be presented in a complete dramatic form.

© Ian Page, 2010

Classical Opera Company's New Release in the Classical Charts!
31 January 2011
Number 14 in the Classical Charts
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Artaxerxes is Disc of the Month
16 January 2011
Chosen by BBC Classics Unwrapped (January 2011)
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The Consort
'...it feels like a live performance.'
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Audiophile Audition
Chosen as 'Best of the Year Discs for 2011'


6moons.com
Blue Moon Award: 'It's excellent from start to finish with amazing young singers...'
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Opera
Disc of the Month: '...artistry of the highest quality.'
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Early Music Review
'...we owe a great debt to conductor Ian Page for bringing [Artaxerxes] back to life. '
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Opera Now
5 Stars
Opera Now Choice: 'The orchestra has a natural sheen and the voices - especially those of the women - are radiant.'
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MusicWeb International
"Anyone with an interest in 18th century opera ought to try the disc. They won't be disappointed."
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Gramophone
"Brilliant tone of Elizabeth Watts...[and] admirable work by all the other voices"
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Gramophone - Super Audio Corner
"The performance is thrilling, with exemplary singing and playing..."
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Audiophile Audition
5 Stars
"I can't recommend this release too highly. It should be in the collection of every opera lover."
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Classic FM
4 Stars
'The recitatives...are delivered with conviction, flowing seamlessly into the arias.'
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BBC Music Magazine
5 Stars
"...here it is presented complete and to a consistently high standard."
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6Moon.com
Blue Moon Award: "The orchestra is spectacular...Linn's studio recording is as usual excellent...Enjoy!"
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The Scotsman
4 Stars
"[A] classy, crystal clear recording."
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International Record Review
'admirable set'
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Pizzicato
"...est rendu dans une lecture vivante, avec d'excellents chanteurs..."
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The Observer
"Elizabeth Watts and Rebecca Bottone shine under Ian Page's crisp direction."
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North London News
"...the singing is both intensely musical and full of acute psychological nuance..."
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The Sunday Times
"Christopher Ainslie is outstanding in the title role."
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SA-CD.net
5 Stars
"I cannot recommend this too strongly...this is truly a set to banish the wintry gloom!"
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