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Mozart: Violin Concertos No. 3 and 4

Julia Fischer

Mozart: Violin Concertos No. 3 and 4

...Disc of the Month in BBC Music Magazine
PTC 5186 064 (Pentatone Classics)
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Tracks: Listen and Download

Format
Track Time Listen
1
Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216: I. Allegro

Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216: I. Allegro

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
09:05 Play $3.40
2
Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216: I. Adagio

Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216: I. Adagio

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
08:21 Play $3.40
3
Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216: III. Rondeau

Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216: III. Rondeau

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
06:11 Play $3.40
4
Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218: I. Allegro

Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218: I. Allegro

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
08:31 Play $3.40
5
Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218: II. Andante cantabile

Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218: II. Andante cantabile

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
07:08 Play $3.40
6
Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218: III. Rondeau

Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218: III. Rondeau

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
06:50 Play $3.40
7
Adagio in E major, K. 261

Adagio in E major, K. 261

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
07:55 Play $3.40
8
Rondo in B flat major, K. 269

Rondo in B flat major, K. 269

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor Yakov Kreizberg
Soloist Julia Fischer: Violin
Band Netherlands Chamber Orchestra
06:23 Play $3.40
Total Running Time 60 minutes Purchase all tracks 
$13.00 
Prices shown in US Dollars

'Fischer does it again....every note gives the impression of being there for a reason, articulated through attack, dynamic phrasing and timbre, but at the same time integrated into the whole.' Performance  / Sound  BBC Music Magazine

This album is licensed for download from Pentatone.

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Julia Fischer

Julia Fischer

German violinist Julia Fischer is recognized worldwide for possessing a talent of uncommon ability and as an exceptionally gifted artist.
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Netherlands Chamber Orchestra

Netherlands Chamber Orchestra

The Netherlands Chamber Orchestra annually provides about 25 concerts on their own 'home stage' of the Amsterdam Concertgebouw. The orchestra also performs in the other halls in the Netherlands and during foreign tours.
profile & recordings >>
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Mozart is one of the most enduringly popular classical composers. He is responsible for over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, piano, operatic, and choral music.
profile & recordings >>
Yakov Kreizberg

Yakov Kreizberg

One of the most interesting and exciting conductors of his generation, Yakov Kreizberg conducted most of the major orchestras throughout Europe, North America and Asia.
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It is likely that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart planned the three violin concertos he composed between October 12 and December 20, 1775 as (part of) a cycle. This is indicated by both the proximity of the dates of these works and the systematic design of the keys - G major, D major and A major: in other words, covering three of the open strings of the violin. Furthermore, the last movement of all three concertos is a French "Rondeau". Strangely enough, after writing his Concerto in A, Mozart appears to have lost all interest in the genre. The following year, he added a kind of violin concerto, consisting of an Andante, Minuet and Rondeau, to his Haffner Serenade K. 250, but that signalled the end of his interest in the violin. From that moment onwards, the piano was the instrument he preferred to use in expressing himself. This caused his father, Leopold, great displeasure, by the way: more than once, he admonished his son as follows: "Du weisst selbst nicht, wie gut Du Violin spielst...".

Although as a rule Mozart's letters provide an excellent insight into his life and ideas, we have no idea what caused this sudden loss of interest in the violin. Was it just a case of the adolescent rebelling against the authoritarian father? Or did Mozart associate the violin too closely with the oppressive Salzburg court of archbishop Colloredo, who in fact dismissed Mozart summarily in the August of 1777?

Perhaps the reason is a far simpler one: the young composer just fell under the spell of a new toy - the fortepiano. The letters sent home by Mozart from Augsburg in November 1777 point in the latter direction. During that tour, he enjoyed great success as a violinist. Among others, he played a violin concerto by his colleague Johann Baptist Vanhal: "Ich machte eine Sinfonie und spielte auf der Violine das Konzert B von Vanhall mit allgemeinem Applaus." But he also placed one of his own violin concertos, the so-called Strasburg Concerto, on the music stands: "Auf die Nacht beim Souper spielte ich das Strassburger Konzert; es ging wie Öl; alles lobte den schönen reinen Ton." But that is all Mozart had to say about his violin-playing. His other letters from Augsburg contain an impassioned account of the new pianofortes being built by Johann Andreas Stein, from which Mozart succeeded in coaxing an as yet unprecedented range of expression.

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