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Time Again

David Sanborn

Time Again

...at his robust, funky best
UNI037 (Decca)
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Tracks: Listen and Download

Track Time Listen
1
Comin' Home Baby

Comin' Home Baby

Composer Bob Dorough, Ben Tucker
Band David Sanborn
07:12 Play
2
Cristo Redentor

Cristo Redentor

Composer

Duke Pearson

Band David Sanborn
05:47 Play
3
Harlem Nocturne

Harlem Nocturne

Composer

Earle Hagen, Dick Rogers

Band David Sanborn
04:51 Play
4
Man From Mars

Man From Mars

Composer Joni Mitchell
Band David Sanborn
05:02 Play
5
Isn't She Lovely

Isn't She Lovely

Composer Stevie Wonder
Band David Sanborn
03:17 Play
6
Sugar

Sugar

Composer

Stanley Turrentine

Band David Sanborn
05:35 Play
7
Tequilla

Tequilla

Composer

Chuck Rio

Band David Sanborn
05:37 Play
8
Little Flower

Little Flower

Composer

David Sanborn

Band David Sanborn
03:37 Play
9
Spider B.

Spider B.

Composer

David Sanborn, Ricky Peterson

Band David Sanborn
06:29 Play
10
Delia

Delia

Composer

David Sanborn

Band David Sanborn
04:20 Play
Total Running Time 52 minutes
Prices shown in US Dollars

A 2003 album from saxophonist David Sanborn, credited as being as good as any of his releases since he began his solo career in the 1970s. He performs some of his own material besides redefining songs by Herbie Mann, Donald Byrd and Stevie Wonder.

This album is licensed for download from Decca.

Download includes - cover art

The alto saxophonist, now 57, boasts a warm, humming timbre, but there's a hint of tartness that creates a welcome tension and prevents the gushy melodrama that afflicts so many pop horn players. Moreover, Sanborn understands that pauses are as important as notes in shaping a line, and his restraint contrasts with the busy overplaying that marks today's pop-instrumental field.

The trick is to keep the variations frequent enough to prevent monotony but small enough to keep the hook and the groove intact. Sanborn does this as well as anyone. His saxophone seems to exult in melody; it will eagerly leap into a phrase and then hold out a climactic note, as if reluctant to let go of something that feels so good. His variations on a theme are aimed more at creating new melodies than new harmonies.

Just listen to how he attacks the two-bar hook of "Tequila." After planting it firmly in our brains, he finds new ending notes for each measure; then he drops half a bar by an octave; then he substitutes a new melodic detour for the first bar, retaining the second; then he inverts that approach. He keeps twisting the phrase into new melodic shapes, but he never obscures the original motif and he never loses the beat.

For Sanborn is a very rhythmic player, toughening his tone to mark the accents in a phrase and using pauses as punctuation. Even though he's the leader, he often sounds as if he's part of the album's all-star rhythm section of guitarist Russell Malone, vibist Mike Mainieri, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Steve Gadd. These jazz musicians add secondary beats to make the bottom more interesting, but like good pop musicians they never leave the primary beat implied; it's always stated quite explicitly and quite crisply.

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