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Wagner / Dressler: The Symphonic Ring

Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra

Wagner / Dressler: The Symphonic Ring

ACO21309 (Acousence Classics)
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ALAC 24bit 192kHz 3,236.7MB $24.00

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FLAC 24bit 96kHz 1,576.2MB $24.00

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FLAC 16bit 44.1kHz 370.0MB $13.00

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ALAC 16bit 44.1kHz 376.4MB $13.00

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MP3 320k 44.1kHz 212.6MB $11.00
Prices shown in US Dollars



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Tracks: Listen and Download

Format
Track Time Listen
1
Prelude Rhinegold

Prelude Rhinegold

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
04:35 Play $1.70
2
The Song of the Rhine Maidens

The Song of the Rhine Maidens

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
00:55 Play $1.70
3
Alberich's "Curse of Love"

Alberich's "Curse of Love"

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:39 Play $1.70
4
The Gods' castle "Valhalla"

The Gods' castle "Valhalla"

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:27 Play $1.70
5
The Forging

The Forging

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:44 Play $1.70
6
Donner's Call

Donner's Call

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:37 Play $1.70
7
Prelude to The Valkyrie

Prelude to The Valkyrie

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:08 Play $1.70
8
Siegmund and Sieglinde

Siegmund and Sieglinde

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:51 Play $1.70
9
Winter Storms

Winter Storms

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
03:59 Play $1.70
10
Siegmund and Sieglinde's Escape

Siegmund and Sieglinde's Escape

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
00:45 Play $1.70
11
Prelude to 2nd Act Valkyrie

Prelude to 2nd Act Valkyrie

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:12 Play $1.70
12
Wotan's Rage

Wotan's Rage

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:23 Play $1.70
13
Ride of the Valkyries (Prelude 3rd Act)

Ride of the Valkyries (Prelude 3rd Act)

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:54 Play $1.70
14
Wotan's Farewell

Wotan's Farewell

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
07:15 Play $3.40
15
Magical Fire

Magical Fire

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
04:47 Play $1.70
16
Prelude 2nd Act Siegfried

Prelude 2nd Act Siegfried

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
04:07 Play $1.70
17
Forest Murmurs

Forest Murmurs

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:14 Play $1.70
18
Siegfried´s Fight with the Dragon

Siegfried´s Fight with the Dragon

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:01 Play $1.70
19
Fafner's Warning

Fafner's Warning

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:40 Play $1.70
20
Prelude 3rd Act Siegfried

Prelude 3rd Act Siegfried

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:39 Play $1.70
21
Night on Bruennhilde's Rock

Night on Bruennhilde's Rock

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:50 Play $1.70
22
Sunrise

Sunrise

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:01 Play $1.70
23
Siegfried-Bruennhilde Duet

Siegfried-Bruennhilde Duet

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
03:31 Play $1.70
24
Siegfried's Rhine Journey

Siegfried's Rhine Journey

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
05:40 Play $3.40
25
Hagen's Battle Summons

Hagen's Battle Summons

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:02 Play $1.70
26
Chorus of the Vassals

Chorus of the Vassals

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
01:11 Play $1.70
27
Prelude to 3rd Act Twilight of the Gods

Prelude to 3rd Act Twilight of the Gods

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
04:08 Play $1.70
28
The Murder of Siegfried

The Murder of Siegfried

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
02:16 Play $1.70
29
Siegfried's Memory of Bruennhilde

Siegfried's Memory of Bruennhilde

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
03:25 Play $1.70
30
Siegfried's Death and Funeral Music

Siegfried's Death and Funeral Music

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
07:59 Play $3.40
31
Bruennhilde's Immolation Scene

Bruennhilde's Immolation Scene

Composer Richard Wagner / Friedmann Dressler
Conductor Jonathan Darlington
Band Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra
07:56 Play $3.40
Total Running Time 93 minutes Purchase all tracks 
$13.00 
Prices shown in US Dollars

To order the CD and for further information about the artist please contact Acousence Records.

Full of suspense, Richard Wagner‘s "Stage festival play for three days and an eve" reworked into a purely orchestral drama as a complete symphony. 

Download includes - cover art, inlay, booklet
Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra

Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra

The Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra is one of Germany's most respected orchestras dating back to 1877.  British conductor Jonathan Darlington is the Orchestra's current musical director.
profile & recordings >>
Jonathan Darlington

Jonathan Darlington

Jonathan Darlington is music director of the Duisburg Philharmonic Orchestra and the Vancouver Opera. His demand for the highest level of professionalism and precision, infused with genuine enthusiasm, has ever increased the quality and popularity of both orchestras.
profile & recordings >>
Richard Wagner

Richard Wagner

Wagner as a German composer, conductor, theatre director and essayist, primarily known for his operas. His compositions are notable for their complex texture with rich harmonies and orchestration.
profile & recordings >>

NEW! DEBUT RECORDING

A new discovery for Wagner fans: The highly dramatic journey takes you right through the "Ring of the Nibelung" in a shortened form spanning a good one and a half hours.

The LIVING CONCERT SERIES embodies, in a very special way, the basic concept behind ACOUSENCE's PHILOSOPHY-LABEL. These music recordings are planned to provide, aside from exceptional musical content and an audiophile sound quality, above all, emotionally intense performances. The spontaneity and naturalness of a live performance, combined with a highly refined recording technique, that is capable of transmitting the smallest of sound-nuances, so essential in portraying atmosphere and emotional content, provide a true "Concert" experience.

Recording producer, recording engineer: Ralf Kolbinger / Ralf Koschnicke 
Mixing engineer, editor: Ralf Koschnicke
Producer: Ralf Koschnicke
Recording facilities: ACOUSENCE recording mobile / ACOUSENCE recordings
Recording location: Mercatorhalle Duisburg, 27./28.05.2009
LIVING CONCERT SERIES Vol. 13
24Bit Quad Sampling Ultra Definition Recording
c & p 2009 ACOUSENCE records

The Symphonic Ring - an orchestral drama in two parts

Compilation and arrangement of the score by Friedmann Dreßler

Single orchestral pieces from Wagner's "Ring of the Nibelung" are frequently to be heard in the concert hall. However, a detailed symphonic pathway through the whole work requires intensive preparation of the musical material. This is particularly the case when - as here - the aim is to keep to the original as closely as possible, nothing being added in the form of new composition.

Several stipulations must be considered: nothing may be changed concerning the chronological sequence of the pieces, however, the proportions must also be correct and the transitions must follow organically. The usable segments are therefore to be selected carefully, always regarding meaningful connections and the dramaturgy of the whole. Thus not all instrumental parts can be used. Ultimately further liberties arise from the use of segments with vocal participation which are reflected either in an instrumental line or are transferred onto an instrument.

In the version recorded  here Friedmann Dreßler has altered Richard Wagner's "Stage Festival Play for Three Days and a Preliminary Evening" into an orchestral drama: As a complete symphonic work the scenes from "The Ring of the Nibelung" proceed virtually seamlessly through the plot in a good one and a half hours. A division into two large segments resulted, so that the selections from "Rhinegold" and "Valkyrie" were combined, as were those from "Siegfried" and "Twilight of the Gods".

Wagner`s "Ring of the Nibelung" in Extracts

Richard Wagner worked on his Stage Festival Play "The Ring of the Nibelung" for a long time. Starting from the first drafts of the scenario in 1848 up to the conclusion of the score in 1874 no less than 26 years passed. The creative process reveals unusual methods. When working on the libretto Wagner began with the finale and step by step turned to earlier scenes, when composing the music however, he now worked in the usual direction -from the beginning to the end. After the first performances of "Rhinegold" and "The Valkyrie" took place in 1869 and 1870 against the will of the composer on order of King Ludwig II, the first complete presentation of the Stage Festival Play "The Ring of the Nibelung" followed in August 1876.

Of course Richard Wagner preferred the complete performance of the "Ring of the Nibelung". Nevertheless, the composer knew that this effort would only be possible at few favoured places, and thus it may be surprising that exactly this ambitious and self-confident musician, who had encouraged a rejection of the division of operas into separate numbers, nevertheless allowed the performance of excerpts. The composer applied this practise from 1862 not least for advertising purposes. First impressions of Wagner's new sound world were therefore already to be had before the premieres of the four parts of the Stage Festival Play.

Whoever encounters the orchestral pieces from the "Ring"- tetralogy, experiences astonishingly varied impressions. Several times the composer commences with real states of nature, out of which he then develops the music, and later also the language!  In addition, there are warlike elements like the "Ride of the Valkyries", majestic ones like the "Funeral Music at the Death of Siegfried" or Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene as well as wonderfully lyrical sections like the "Forest Murmurs" in the second "Siegfried" act. It is hereby quite astonishing how Wagner influenced the younger composers and presented works with model character.

The boldness of the composer Richard Wagner already shows itself in his harmonic restraint in the "Rhinegold" prelude. For 136 bars the music entwines itself around the E flat major triad. Such a phenomenon was inconceivable until then, and even if Wagner's music could originate completely without models, nevertheless, it became the prototype for all other compositions which were to give the impression of depth of water. The composer was not at a loss where the invention of original myths was concerned, and thus he wrote in his autobiographic recollections "My Life", how the thought for this prelude had come to him in Italy: "I sank into a kind of somnambulant state, in which I suddenly got the sensation, as if I were sinking into strongly flowing water. The rushing of the water soon presented itself to me in the musical sound of the E flat major chord which surged inexorably in a figurated refraction; these refractions appeared as melodic figurations of increasing movement, the pure triad of E flat major, however, never changed. It seemed to want to give, by virtue of its length, to the element into which I was sinking, an infinite meaning. With the sensation, that the waves were now racing high above me, I awoke with a start, from my half sleep. Straight away I recognized that the orchestral prelude to ‘Rhinegold' as I carried it around within me, and yet had not exactly been able to find‚ had appeared to me.

Wagner's orchestral treatment knows iridescent glistening as well as sweeping sound eruptions. The regions of nature and work often encounter each other in the "Ring of the Nibelung". When someone forges in "Rhinegold" or in "Siegfried", this happens simply by the use of the hammer so realistically as never before on the operatic stage. Nature can be harsh in the "Ring of the Nibelung", as in the stormy beginning of "The Valkyrie", but also lyrical and inviting as in the "Forest Murmurs" in the second "Siegfried" act. However, the "Ride of the Valkyries" is warlike and aggressive, and when from this time on warlike music was needed, often nothing more suitable could be found than Wagner's relentlessly forward surging music, especially for the medium of film. Wagner's music can be eerie and uncanny, but a listener may equally be attracted by the ingenious sound combinations in the "Twilight of the Gods", after Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, when, to the sounds of the redemption motive, the old culpable world goes up in flames or sinks into the floods of the Rhine.

The Orchestra in the "Ring of the Nibelung"

Richard Wagner's Festival Stage Play "The Ring of the Nibelung" requires a gigantic orchestra. The following instrumentation was intended by the composer: three flutes and a piccolo, three oboes and a cor anglais, three clarinets and a bass clarinet, three bassoons, eight horns (whereby the players of the third and fourth horn pair also have to play two tenor tubas and two bass tubas), a contrabass tuba, three trumpets and a bass trumpet, three trombones and a  contrabass trombone, timpani and other percussion instruments, six harps, sixteen first and sixteen second violins, twelve violas, twelve cellos and eight double basses; Further, amongst others, the usage on stage of eighteen anvils is planned.  Already this listing allows one to deduce the emphasized role of the orchestra for Richard Wagner. A subordinated accompaniment by the orchestra would deeply contradict such a huge outlay.

Due to the expanse of the composition it can be of no surprise that in the "Ring of the Nibelung", numerous longer or shorter instrumental pieces appear. These are not only preludes and introductions, but also pieces in the midst of single acts. Here, in the treatment of the orchestra, but not only here, Richard Wagner's work with leitmotivs is apparent. Fundamentally this technique is not new. It was applied, but less distinctively, already in Wagner's romantic operas "The Flying Dutchman", "Tannhäuser" and "Lohengrin". It had even made a first appearance in Carl Maria von Weber's work. Even if Wagner himself spoke less of Leitmotivs than of Recollection Motives, this technique nevertheless achieved, in the "Ring of the Nibelung", its greatest development. It is a kind of musical prose, where the situation produces the form and creates a close net of relationships. In this manner Wagner's music often has a gestural character, and occasionally allows the listener to know more than the stage characters themselves. In total the Leitmotiv technique is so developed that Peter Tchaikowsky is not wrong in calling Richard Wagner primarily a symphonic composer: "What a Don Quixote is this Wagner! Why does he go to such trouble to reach the impossible, when his great talent would enable him to create infinite beauty, if he, in full devotion to his talent, were to follow its natural laws. In my opinion Wagner is, above all, a symphonic composer".

Michael Tegethoff

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