Related Reviews
Mojo
4 Stars
'Liane Carroll doesn't just sing jazz. She is jazz. This is jazz of the highest quality. Believe.'
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Jazzwise
4 Stars
'exceptional album'
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The Guardian
4 Stars
'...casually expressive, unblinkingly honest, and often charmingly autobiographical album by the superb British standards-and-ballads singer Liane Carroll...'
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Jazzwise
‘Liane Carroll has that rare ability to meld effortless, often transcendent vocal and piano technique, with heart stopping emotion and soul bearing power. It should be no surprise then that her latest album, Seaside, combines all this with a savvy sophistication befitting of one of Britain’s finest jazz singers.’
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BBC Radio 2 'Jamie Cullum'
'Another great British musician; a big fan of hers…well worth your time, the whole album…the title track is a beautiful one written by Joe Stilgoe.'
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The Jazz Breakfast
'Liane Carroll has to be the most flexible singer in the business, capable of such sensitive delicacy one minute and such gutsy raunchiness the next. This disc continues her purple patch.'
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BBC Radio London ‘Robert Elms’
Live In Session ‘She was great. It’s a really good album.’
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York Press
'Liane Carroll's finest work to date.'
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The New Listener
,,Bei Seaside stimmt absolut alles, wodurch dieses Album unbestreitbar zu den hörenswertesten Jazzneuheiten zählt.''
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The Observer
4 Stars
'It's a haunting piece ["Seaside"], beautifully arranged, which brings out her extraordinary ability to absorb the essence of a song and deliver it with such candour that you scarcely notice the artistry involved.'
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London Evening Standard
4 Stars
'Carroll sends her big, warm voice swinging through "Almost Like Being In Love" and the Morecambe and Wise theme, "Bring Me Sunshine". There's soul here, too, on a version of "Mercy Now" by Mary Gauthier; a sensitive take on Alison Krauss's already fragile "Get Me Through December" is set to prompt oceans of tears.'
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The Scotland Herald
'... immaculately produced by James McMillan, this is not only Carroll's best disc, but one of the finest non-classical releases in the Linn catalogue.'
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BBC Scotland ‘Jazz House’
‘She is just the biggest, best bundle of musical fun you could possibly imagine. She is also one of the most fantastic jazz singers and pianists in the world. Her name, is Liane Carroll…from it is a blistering version showcasing no only Liane’s fabulous piano playing, but her amazing scat singing on “Almost Like Being In Love”...It's quite phenomenal...She's a real star.'
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The Sunday Times
'The title number, written by the irrepressible Joe Stilgoe, has to be one of the finest new songs of the year, the bittersweet lyrics burnished by Evan Jolly's brass-band arrangement.'
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The Scotsman
4 Stars
'The warm-voiced and open-hearted singer and pianist Liane Carroll pays tribute to her home port of Hastings, nailing her colours affectionately and often passionately to the mast.'
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BBC Radio 3 ‘Jazz Line-Up’
'She has the remarkable ability to sing every song totally from the heart as if she has just written it herself...this is the title track written especially for her by the uber-talented Joe Stilgoe.'
more >>
Bebop Spoken Here
'another outstanding project'
more >>
Jazz Views
'This is a wonderful album by one of our greatest jazz talents so full of quality and diversity. I doubt if there will be a better vocal based recording issued anywhere this year.'
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Liane Carroll - Seaside - AP Reviews


16 September 2015
AP Reviews
Adrian Pallant

BREATHE IN DEEPLY, and you can almost sense that familiar, hazy blend of aromas on the breeze: salty sea air, fish'n'chips, candy floss... and then the distant sounds of brass band vibrato and children's play against a reassuring, shingle-stroked ebb tide. It's all conjured by eminent, award-winning British jazz/soul singer Liane Carroll in a new coastal-inspired collection of songs - Seaside.

The vocalist/pianist who brought us such memorable gems as her own, peppy Dublin Morning and a powerfully emotive interpretation of Tom Waits' Picture in a Frame now reaches new heights in this, her ninth album, surrounding herself with a fabulous array of musicians (notably multi-instrumentalist and producer James McMillan). Prompted by friend and renowned singer, pianist and songwriter Joe Stilgoe (who gifted Carroll the wonderfully evocative and wistful title track), here are ten songs inspired by the singer's affection for her home town of Hastings; an inviting musical promenade which encounters sunny exuberance, swaggering grooves and tender, reassuring love, sometimes tinged with melancholy.

That title track is, indeed, a winner - its swirling silver band arrangement and classy, solid, melodic hooks (easily redolent of late Lennon & McCartney) combine with lyrics which tell a story of ardent, carefree, though perhaps seasonal companionship ("We'll always have the seaside"); and love's exhilaration is embodied in the bubbly piano-trio-and-scat burst of Lerner and Loewe's Almost Like Being in Love (or Hove, as teasingly alternatively titled by Liane!). One of this album's exquisite surprises is a thoughtful, mellow rendering of Arthur Kent and Sylvia Dee's Bring Me Sunshine - light years away from Eric'n'Ern's japes, it might warmly pictorialise the cuddled devotedness of a couple looking out across the waves from their seafront shelter.

Led Zeppelin's originally heavy-rocking Nobody's Fault But Mine is effectively reimagined as a gravelly, bluesy strut (featuring Julian Siegel on tenor) - those characteristically wide, soulful vocals as impressive as ever; and the countryfied feel of Fred Lavery and Gordie Sampson's Get Me Through December (previously recorded by, amongst others, Alison Krauss) becomes quietly majestic in Carroll's hands. Evan Jolly's broad, gospel-imbued arrangement of Mary Gauthier's Mercy Now displays all the brassy stature of an Elton John chart high-rider; and Wild is the Wind (from the 1950s movie of the same name) features the lush piano and brass arrangements of Malcolm Edmonstone, its haunting lyricism emphasised by bowed and sustained vibes.

A guitar-accompanied vocal interlude - popular 1930s standard I Cover the Waterfront, which Carroll has always wanted to record - is delightfully decorated by Rob Luft's scampering fret work; and My Ship (Kurt Weill & Ira Gershwin), with a playful vocal timbre reminiscent of Natalie Cole, cruises breezily before switching into fast scat swing. Finally, in recognition of the ever-present dangers of seafaring communities, Liane offers a poignant reading of J B Dykes' familiar hymn tune Melita (words by William Whiting) - For Those In Peril on the Sea‘s reverent vocals are underpinned by Mark Edwards' sublime jazz piano and organ harmonies, enhanced by James McMillan's plaintive flugelhorn.

Seaside consolidates Liane Carroll's position as one of the UK's most expressive jazz/soul vocalists and pianists in an accessible recording which combines unalloyed high spirits with beauteous, heart aching emotion.


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