Related Reviews
MusicWeb International
'...unusual, provocative, and masterfully conceived...an essential acquisition.'
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Serenade Magazine
'...that he should bow out with a performance of such richness and depth showcases many of their finest qualities, and celebrates a recording which is a significant milestone in both their careers.'
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The Herald
5 Stars
'Ticciati has found new ways to approach the phrasing and tempo of these symphonies that produced surprises every step of the way...A top team on top form.'
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Fanfare
'The good news is that overall these performances feel not only Brahmsian but also full of color and variety.'
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Gramophone
A scintillating account of Brahms’s symphonies, in no small part due to the dynamics and detail of the 192kHz/24-bit Linn download.
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American Record Guide
'I think the balances are terrific, as are the Scottish strings and the overall sound of the orchestra. The recording was made in Usher Hall, Edinburgh; that must be part of the reason the sound is so beautiful. And I hear more agility in the playing than I have heard with larger orchestras.'
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ResMusica
'A very beautiful, fascinating, original and audacious interpretation...'
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Hi-Fi News
Sound Quality 85%: 'Ticciati has prepared this cycle as his final SCO project, and these are highly intelligent readings, finely engineered.'
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Classica
Recording of the Month: 'The young British conductor radically revisits Brahms' four symphonies by questioning decades of musical interpretations and rediscoveries.'
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Klassiskmusikk.com
5 Stars
6/6: 'You will, I hope, find these readings exciting and moving in equal measure, and I can hardly recommend them to you strongly enough'
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All Music
5 Stars
'Robin Ticciati and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra present a fresh take on the symphonies...Linn's pristine sound quality is a perfect complement to Ticciati's transparent readings. Highly recommended.'
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BR Klassik
CD-Tipp: 'The result is an unbelievably exciting journey through the symphonic world of this composer.'
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BBC Music Magazine
5 Stars
Recording of the Month: 'These are revelatory performances that make you listen afresh to this wonderful life-enhancing music.'
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BRF
'Schlanker, lebhafter und klanglich klarer kann man sich die Brahms-Symphonien kaum wünschen als in dieser neuen Aufnahme des Scottish Chamber Orchestra.'
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The Arts Desk
'Magical moments abound...this is the best recent recording of [No. 3] I've heard.'
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Online Merker
'This new recording with the SCO is no less than THE Brahms of our day.'
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Gramophone
'Ticciati's is lean and quite dazzlingly transparent. Listening with score in hand, I marvelled at the conductor's meticulous observance of Brahms's markings. Nearly every instruction regarding dynamics, phrasing and articulation is accounted for.'
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The Guardian
5 Stars
CD of the Week: 'What stands out is the sheer range of sound and colour Ticciati has at his disposal...the playing is unfailingly vivid.'
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The Scotsman
5 Stars
'There is enticing detail in these performances...and there is a truly natural sense of expression that highlights the genuine beauty in Brahms.'
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Kulturradio RBB
CD der Woche: Robin Ticciati liefert eine schöne und raue Interpretation, flott, glasklar und trotzdem schön warm in der Anmutung.
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Spiegel
'Alles fließt, alles strömt, diese Fülle präparieren Ticciati und das Scottish Chamber Orchester detailfreudig und präzise heraus.'
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BBC Radio Scotland 'Classics Unwrapped'
Album of the Week: '...as always the playing is first class from the SCO...It’s a delight to listen to from start to finish.'
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The Herald
'I predict universal praise for the new double set...the whole package takes us through the story of Brahms and his relationship with symphonic form in a way that is a real joy.'
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BBC Radio 3 'Record Review'
Disc of the Week: '...think about what you gain in the clarity of texture...brighter, lighter sounds balanced against the smaller string sections...'
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NDR
'Bei ihm klingen die Sinfonien nicht herbstlich und düster - die Betonung liegt auf dem rauen, romantischen Fieber, das in der Partitur steckt.'
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Europadisc
'...with the SCO’s superb musicianship and Ticciati’s unmistakable imagination and energy [this is] a cycle that really is worth celebrating.'
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The Times
5 Stars
'...this is a set that sweeps aside recent rivals, brilliantly illuminating Brahms's inner textures and making the familiar new.'
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iTunes
'...marvel at the delicacy of his phrasing and the litheness of his lines...this is Brahms to savor.'
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Radio Classique
'Un souci d’allègement et de transparence des textures préside à cette lecture...'
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Financial Times
4 Stars
'...they have every slightest detail at their fingertips, illuminating phrase after phrase with new meaning...this is a highly rewarding set of the symphonies, well played and well recorded.'
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CD Choice
'...this Brahms cycle is a worthy successor to his earlier much-acclaimed readings of the symphonies of Schumann...the sound is still highly impressive, the performances top-drawer.'
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Classic FM
'...that should certainly be in our Hall of Fame.'
more >>
Presto Classical
'A classy leaving-present from one of today’s great conductor-orchestra partnerships as Robin Ticciati says goodbye to the Scottish Chamber Orchestra.'
more >>

Robin Ticciati & SCO - Brahms: The Symphonies - MusicWeb International


22 May 2018
MusicWeb International
John Quinn

I’ve heard most of the recordings that Scottish Chamber Orchestra and Robin Ticciati have made together and I’ve been consistently impressed. Their set of the Schumann symphonies (review) particularly whetted my appetite for this latest release. This Brahms set is something of a valedictory as it’s the last recording project that Ticciati will make with the SCO in his role as Principal Conductor, a position he has occupied since the 2009/10 season. However, in a booklet note he says that these recordings “mark the end of the first chapter of my relationship with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra.” That surely signifies an intention for the collaboration to continue on a guest conducting basis and perhaps more recordings will result. We must hope so.

When I received this pair of CDs for review I knew that there could be only one choice for a comparative version: the cycle that Sir Charles Mackerras set down with the SCO in January 1997 which was issued by Telarc (review ~ review ~ review). I invested in these recordings a good many years ago when they were first issued as a 3-disc boxed set, and I esteem them highly.

There are many similarities between the two sets. Both use the same size of string choir (10/8/6/6/4) with the violins divided left and right. Mackerras used “Vienna” horns in F and rotary-valve trumpets and narrow-bore trombones. Ticciati doesn’t specifically mention his trumpets – though I bet he employed similar instruments – but he mentions that the same type of horns and trombones were used. Furthermore, both conductors are sparing in their use of string vibrato, though to my ears it sounds as if Ticciati is even more sparing than Mackerras. The consequence of all this is that we hear “lean” performances in which clarity of texture is very much apparent. Furthermore, the relatively small number of string players on duty means that Brahms’ woodwind and brass parts register with more than usual prominence. Some may feel the results are a bit too much of a good thing. However, on neither set are the strings drowned and I relish the opportunity to enjoy to the full Brahms’ writing for the woodwinds in particular.

When the Mackerras set was issued it aroused great interest since it represented – for the first time on disc, I think – an attempt to recreate the size of orchestra and therefore the sound which Brahms might have experienced in his day – though orchestra sizes varied quite a bit in the late nineteenth century. I believe that the forces that Mackerras particularly had in mind were those of the Meiningen Court Orchestra in the days (1886-1903) when Fritz Steinbach was its conductor. The Mackerras set was a pioneering venture in this regard. Since then, we’ve become more accustomed to hearing the Brahms symphonies played on small-ish orchestras: I think of the recordings by Sir John Eliot Gardiner and Thomas Dausgaard.

Before considering the performances, it may be worth saying a little about the respective recordings, especially as both were set down using the same ensemble and forces and in the same venue. We auditioned the Ticciati set in the MusicWeb International Listening Studio in April 2018 and we were very impressed. We found the sound was very realistic and we admired the clarity which engineer Philip Hobbs had achieved. We liked the positive but not too heavy bass and felt overall that the extract from the set to which we listened was very pleasing. Listening on my own equipment at home, I found that the extract in question – the first movement of the Second symphony – was typical of the set as a whole. I found that the sound had admirable presence. The Telarc recording still sounds very good but the listener is given the impression that the orchestra is a bit further away and there is more hall ambience around the sound. I’ve never been in the Usher Hall but I can best describe the difference between the two recordings thus: with Linn you feel you’re in the front stalls, perhaps about 10 rows back from the stage; the Telarc engineers place you about halfway back in the stalls. I mention the difference not in order implicitly to criticise one or other but merely to point out the difference. Both recordings are technically very successful, I think.

Although I’ll make comparisons between the Ticciati and Mackerras performances as I discuss each one, what struck me was the overall degree of similarity between them in terms of basic interpretative approach. There’s very often a high degree of energy in Ticciati’s readings, epitomised by mobile tempi. That might lead you to class the performances as “young man’s Brahms” – the conductor was 34 when he made the recordings. But turn to Mackerras and time and again you find similar energy and vitality. This is “young man’s Brahms” from a conductor who was 71 at the time that he set down his interpretations!

The first movement of the First symphony gets off to a bracing start under Ticciati: there’s no Klemperer-like massiveness here. Interestingly, the younger conductor’s tempo is very slightly broader than the one adopted by his distinguished predecessor, Mackerras and because the Linn recording is a bit closer one is more conscious of the pounding timpani. Both conductors give compelling accounts of the introduction, emphasising that serious business is afoot, yet at the same time both achieve commendable momentum. The Allegro bounds forth like a panther in Ticciati’s hands but Mackerras has just as much vitality. He scores over Ticciati by repeating the exposition. Both performances are powerful and urgent – and both hold the listener’s attention throughout.

Ticciati’s account of the Andante sostenuto is a winning one and he is especially well served by his violin, oboe and horn soloists. However, when I listened to Mackerras I felt that the sound of the SCO is even more persuasive for him – perhaps a little more warming vibrato? - and I found a little more in his phrasing. Ticciati’s performance is very pleasing, though, and the closing section (from 5:47) is radiant, the violin and horn duet falling gratefully on the ear. Moving to the finale, I admired very much the degree of suspense that Ticciati achieves at the start – the slightly grainy sound of his strings is a definite asset here. The great horn solo (2:03) rings out proudly and then, when the Allegro non troppo, ma con brio is reached, the famous broad melody is relished by his strings – and the music has momentum. Mackerras, too, is searching in the introduction and once the main body of the movement is reached his performance is no less spirited. Ticciati has a slight edge, I feel when it comes to injecting fire and drama into those passages that require those qualities although, in truth, I find it hard to choose between the two performances. At 14:22 Ticciati really drives hard for the finish line and when the majestic chorale arrives he doesn’t make too much of a slowing – which I approve of. Mackerras follows tradition by broadening rather more for the chorale. Ticciati’s coda is electrifying.

In the Second symphony Ticciati achieves a nice, easy flow at the start of the first movement, as does Mackerras at a very similar tempo. At 4:48 Ticciati goes straight into the development. I’m always sorry when a conductor ignores the repeat; happily, Mackerras observes it. Though the first movement is primarily a lyrical proposition there are passages where urgency is required and both our conductors are fully alive to this. Despite the lack of that repeat I find Ticciati’s reading of this movement very satisfying – and bracing at times. His cellos are super at the start of the Adagio non troppo. Ticciati unfolds this movement with warmth and suitable expansiveness. In truth, I find it hard to express a preference between him and Mackerras. The Serenade-like character of the third movement is accentuated when the wind are given prominence, as happens in both these recordings. Later, both the present-day SCO and the 1997 cohort play the quicker music with admirable dexterity. The two performances of the finale are almost identically paced and both conductors offer refreshing, effervescent accounts of the music. From 8:04 Ticciati brings the symphony home with an exhilarating burst of energy but when I played the Mackerras performance I found that he is exultant too; indeed, arguably his brass are even more thrilling at the close.

Ticciati’s account of the Third symphony opens with a starburst of energy. This movement is a prime vindication of the use of a reduced string band because it’s wonderful to hear Brahms’ marvellous writing for the woodwind come through with such clarity. Again, Ticciati’s approach is broadly similar to Mackerras’ way with the music – both observe the repeat – and both conductors treat us to super performances. The Ticciati performance of the Andante is warm and easeful. As in the third movement of the Second, the prominence of the woodwind brings out the Serenade-like character of the music. The finale is very well brought off by Ticciati. At 0:47 in his performance the music erupts into life, the tempo urgent and festive. Mind you, Mackerras is no slouch in this movement. I really enjoyed Ticciati’s performance of this swift section of this movement; it’s full of urgency and fire, the SCO responding to him with acuity. At 5:45 he begins the long wind-down to the end and now the music takes on a warm sunset glow. After all the preceding energy, the way Ticciati rounds off this movement is deeply satisfying. Brahms’ conclusion is poetic and richly rewarding and both Ticciati and Mackerras give the listener a fine experience. Some listeners may feel that in these closing pages the slightly more distanced recording on the Telarc set is more appropriate but I listened to the coda with deep contentment in both versions.

Robin Ticciati leads a taut account of the first movement of the Fourth symphony. Arguably, that sense of tautness is accentuated by the ease with which the non-stringed instruments can be heard. This is a sinewy performance, full of strength and urgency. The Mackerras performance is similar in conception but sounds somewhat softer grained: perhaps that’s down to the more distanced Telarc recording. The Andante moderato is finely nuanced in Ticciati’s hands. This performance presents a prime example of the intimacy which he says he sought to achieve in these recordings. That said, the climax (from around 7:00) is not lacking in power. I really enjoyed this account of the movement. Unsurprisingly, Ticciati brings great energy and rhythmic vitality to the short third movement. His interpretation of the passacaglia finale is very impressive. He opens very powerfully, the accents really maximised. The early minutes of this movement are full of thrust: the music-making is very exciting. The bare, melancholy flute variation and the subdued passages which follow are done with delicacy- Mackerras is a fraction broader here - and then, from 5:35 onwards, as the music again picks up intensity, Ticciati ensures that Brahms’ urgent writing is strongly projected. This is a terrific, dramatic reading of the finale.

This, then, is a very fine Brahms symphony cycle from Robin Ticciati and the SCO. It’s a very good way for him to bid au revoir to the orchestra. It’s been fascinating to compare and contrast his performances with those in the distinguished and stimulating Mackerras cycle. As I hope I’ve pointed out, the two cycles are broadly similar in conception though there are many small differences of nuance between them. One thing that is consistent is the terrific playing of the Scottish Chamber Orchestra both in 1997 and 2017. Their recordings with Sir Charles evidenced the great rapport they had with them and this new set confirms the feeling I’ve had from listening to their previous releases, that the orchestra has an equally strong bond with Ticciati. If I were pressed on pain of dire sanctions to express a preference for one SCO cycle over the other I think Mackerras would get my vote – just – on account of the repeats he observes in the first movements of the First and the Second symphonies, the latter especially, Happily, I don’t have to make that choice: I now have both sets in my collection to return to and enjoy in the future.

Ticciati’s cycle, like the Mackerras performances, gives us an opportunity to experience these symphonies with forces – and therefore orchestral textures – of the sort with which Brahms himself would have been familiar. That by itself wouldn’t be a reason for acquiring the Ticciati set but when one takes into account the freshness and vigour he brings to this music as well as the evident empathy and understanding behind his interpretations then they become a very attractive proposition indeed.

The documentation – essays by the conductor and by Dr Martin Ennis – is very good indeed.


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Brahms: The SymphoniesBrahms: The Symphonies