Related Reviews
All Music Guide
'AllMusic’s Favorite Classical Instrumental Albums of 2012'
more >>
BBC Music Online
Review of Robin Ticciati
more >>
Fanfare
'These movements are so powerfully produced, artfully shaped, and clearly articulated that they put every other recording I've heard of them to shame....'
more >>
theartsdesk.com
'...it’s as if you’re being drawn into a shaggy-dog story told by an old roué.'
more >>
Audio Review
'...Buon ascolto!'
more >>
NPR Deceptive Cadence
'Robin Ticciati conducts beyond his years in a debut recording with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra.'
more >>
Positive Feedback Online
'The recording itself, is an excellent SACD'.
more >>
BBC Radio 3 'CD Review'
Disc of the Week: '...it's a thrilling achievement.'
more >>
MusicWeb International
'It's this disc I'll be coming back to when I want to be reminded of just how ground-breaking it still sounds.'
more >>
resmusica.com

more >>
SA-CD.net
5 Stars
'Enormously recommended & one of those recordings that makes one listen to a masterpiece in a new light'.
more >>
Early Music Review
'...as a whole the performance is very exciting.'
more >>
Hi-Fi News
'Ticciati's is very much a version to hear...'
more >>
Pizzicato
'Avec leur interpretation de la Symphonie Fantastique, Robin Ticciati et le Scottish Chamber Orchestra savant ajouter un element particulier à la riche discographie de l'œuvre, car on n'aura pas encore entendu une Symphonie fantastique si légère, si transparente, et si superbement romantique.'
more >>
Audio Video Club of Atlanta
'...a nicely nuanced and characterized performance...'
more >>
InfoDad.com
4 Stars
'The results are refreshing.'
more >>
Limelight Magazine
5 Stars
'...this thrilling recording is the one to listen to. Highly recommended.'
more >>
BBC Music Magazine
5 Stars
'...[a] refreshing approach, especially in spectacularly clear and spacious sound.'
more >>
International Record Review
'...it's unquestionably an impressive debut.'
more >>
Gramophone
'Why did we do the opening 100 times? Because it's one of the most difficult moments in all of music.' RT
more >>
MusicWeb International
Recording of the Month: 'Palate-cleansing, ear-pricking performances. Not to be missed.'
more >>
Gramophone
'The clarity, coordination and spectrum of colour in the orchestra are spot-on for Berlioz.'
more >>
ClassicsToday.com
'playing of astonishing virtuosity and transparency'
more >>
The Big Issue
'...Berlioz is fresh and visceral and whimsically wide-eyed.'
more >>
AllMusic.com
5 Stars
'...a genuinely startling, risk-taking, and fun performance...absolutely recommended.'
more >>
The Sunday Telegraph
5 Stars
'[Ticciati] draws superlative playing, notably in a thrilling first movement...'
more >>
Completely Berlioz
'This is an awesome performance.'
more >>
Musicweb International
'...the full snarling menace of the March to the Scaffold is extremely well captured...'
more >>
ClassicFM
CD of the Week: '...a wonderful recording...'
more >>
Presto News
'Ticciati's impressive gift for wonderfully shaping each phrase kept me interested from start to finish'
more >>
The Herald
'It is an awesome performance...as thought-provoking as it is potent.'
more >>
Financial Times
' Ticciati has assumed Colin Davis’s mantle in this music, giving it a natural pulse and dramatic shape.'
more >>
The Telegraph
5 Stars
'...this first collaboration on disc captures all the energy, the finesse and the sheer panache with which he invests his live concerts...'
more >>
The Guardian
'...the transparency and lightness of touch Ticciati achieves is a real bonus...'
more >>
Sunday Times
Classical CD of the Week: '...remarkable for its fresh insights...'
more >>

Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique - SCO & Ticciati - Audiophile Audition


09 August 2012
Audiophile Audition
Steven Ritter
5 Stars

27-year-old Robin Ticciati, conductor of the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Bamberg Symphony has been making quite a splash as the youngest conductor to do this, that, or the other, depending on which orchestra or opera or festival we are talking about. Sometimes the parents just have to shove the kid out of the nest, and in this case Linn Records has done just that, giving the young man a crack at one of the most-recorded symphonies in the world, and one that has at least ten (that I can think of) legendary readings as well-and they all still hold up just fine, thank you. A couple of years ago I reviewed what I then thought a superb reading by Janowski and Pittsburgh and concluded that it didn't supplant the 1954 Munch/Boston reading in fantastic two-channel SACD sound-still the best in my opinion-but that it was probably the best modern version available especially if one wanted to consider the sound.

And now along comes this one, by a chamber orchestra of all things, and a conductor I was just marginally familiar with. Let's get the chamber thing out of the way first-with 30-some strings we easily get enough heft, and the way the Super Audio surround catches detail after detail, and the way Ticciati brings such special and apt emphasis to so many hidden things in the orchestration, well, believe me, crank up the volume on this little honey and you get all the orchestra you want, and more than your neighbors might like. The SCO has luscious tonal qualities and all the technical acumen of the Concertgebouw, so there is not much to complain about.

Interpretatively Ticciati gets it all just about right; okay, maybe he's just a tad slow in the first movement, and maybe I miss a little of the superimposed rush to the finish line in the last movement-not that this one is short on adrenaline-but these are quibbles in a performance that is remarkably consistent and brilliantly illuminating on just about any count you can think of. There really is freshness in the interpretation that hits you head on, as if you were just discovering this piece. (Remember the first time you ever heard this? And how blown away you were? I get some of that feeling here as well, or at least an excitement that he is hearing it that way.) It's nice to realize that the younger generation understands the significance of this piece as well as we older folks, and can even lead us to hear things we never did!

Beatrice and Benedict, after Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing was created as a sort of respite when Berlioz finally put to rest  The Trojans, but his fatigue at that later time of life didn't stop him from granting this opera (and overture) a litheness and humor that another of the old guard, Verdi, was to find in Falstaff. Ticciati again finds just the right amount of lightness and precision to give us a splendid reading.

What else can I say? Get this!


Bookmark and Share


Related Links

Robin TicciatiRobin Ticciati
Scottish Chamber OrchestraScottish Chamber Orchestra
Berlioz: Symphonie FantastiqueBerlioz: Symphonie Fantastique