Related Reviews
American Record Guide
'To say my hopes were exceeded barely begins to describe his transcendent reading.'
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Gramophone
‘Zander’s fidelity to Mahler’s markings remains remarkable.’
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Choir & Organ
5 Stars
‘…it is a truly insightful, inspiring and engaging reading from a Mahler interpreter of considerable and honest musicality.’
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International Record Review
'intimacy and rare beauty'
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ConcertoNet.com
'The pliant and rapturous playing of the Philharmonia, the outstanding soloists, and Zander’s powerful and fresh reading make this an exciting release and a welcome addition to the catalogue.’
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The Irish Times
5 Stars
'...of remarkable beauty...'
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The Sunday Times
'Essential listening.'
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BBC Music Magazine
'Orchestral quality is never in doubt...outstanding...'
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MusicWeb International
Recording of the Month: 'Zander and his players bring out Mahler's sardonic humour...which I've never heard delivered quite like this...a fantastic, keenly observed performance.'
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MahlerReviews.com
'...beautiful, and beautifully captured...'
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Herald Scotland
'...the Philharmonia Chorus...are fabulous.'
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AllMusic.com
5 Stars
'...one of the best of 2013.'
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Words and Music
Disc of the Day: '...beautifully timed by Zander...'
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Pizzicato
4 Stars
‘Any committed Mahlerian should not miss the release.’
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Boston Globe
‘It’s tender and reverent, and full of detail.’
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Benjamin Zander - Philharmonia Orchestra - Mahler: Symphony No. 2 - The Times


15 November 2013
The Times
Geoff Brown
4 Stars

Mahler's stock in the world shows no sign of diminishing...one from...the cultish figure of Benjamin Zander...whose live Mahler performances regularly draw hushed crowds.

His new release with the Philharmonia Orchestra resumes a cycle put in jeopardy in 2009 when the Telarc label stopped making its own recordings. Glasgow-based Linn Records has picked up Zander's torch and the warmth and clarity of sound entirely suits a conductor famous for his close attention to Mahler's multiple markings of stress and dynamics.

With speeds he proves a little more cavalier. This Second Symphony, the Resurrection, lasts 90 minutes - towards the upper end of what is usually expected. Most of the amplitude comes in the finale, though hesitations arrive even in the phrases of the 'Andante', first haven in the symphony's storms. Reticent trumpets apart, the Philharmonia generates a tremendously rich sound. But don't expect searing agony: Zander prefers the lofty objective view, and lets the drama of death and resurrection unfold without jabbing our elbows.

Special ingredients? The tense opening bars; the feeling radiating from mezzo Sarah Connolly; the finale's first steps, so gravely beautiful; the prayerful singing of the choir, steady at the slowest speeds. And Linn hasn't forgotten Zander's specialty: a valuable audio analysis, longer than the symphony itself, available as a free download.


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Benjamin ZanderBenjamin Zander
Gustav MahlerGustav Mahler
Miah PerssonMiah Persson
Philharmonia ChorusPhilharmonia Chorus
Philharmonia OrchestraPhilharmonia Orchestra
Sarah ConnollySarah Connolly
Mahler: Symphony No. 2 'Resurrection'Mahler: Symphony No. 2 'Resurrection'