Related Reviews
The Strad
Alison McGillivray is an imaginative and stylish interpreter of Geminiani's six cello sonatas op. 5.
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The Financial Times
Awarded Best Classical CD of 2005
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Music-Web International
She offers sensitive, committed playing...
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The Whold Note (Toronto)
...richness in embellishment...
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Early Music Today
...superbly expressive and imaginative playing...
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International Record Review
I have enjoyed this CD very much, and shall return to it often.
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The Herald
5 Stars
...the disc, with its endless stream of stylish and imaginative performance strokes, is absolutely convincing.
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ClassicalSource.com
This is imaginative playing of the first rank.
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The Dominion Post (Wellington, NZ)
5 Stars
The sound is breathtakingly natural, making this a release that, while mandatory for baroque specialists, should be owned by all music lovers.
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Early Music Review
Alison and her trio of co-conspirators have that something special in buckets.
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The Daily Telegraph
Her warm, rich sound has a sunny autumnal maturity...
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The Sunday Herald
Alive and stylish.
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MusicWeek
A recording full of "expressive and imaginative sounds"
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Geminiani - Alison McGillivray - The Times


30 July 2005
The Times
Rick Jones

Francesco Geminiani (1687-1762) was a Londoner. He played the violin for King George with Handel at the harpsichord. What a multicultured city! The six sonatas that he wrote in 1746 for cello and continuo are played here by solo cellist Alison McGillivray, cembalist David McGuinness, continuo cellist Joe Crouch and baroque guitarist Eligio Quinteiro. The sounds contrast. The gut-strung cellists keep their distance pitch-wise, while McGuinness's metallic tinkling is a silver context for the soloist. Quinteiro's Baroque guitar plunks quietly, modestly and seductively in the background. No one would know that his instrument, electrified, would one day rule the world. The music swings from sighing movements to cheerful jigs. It is the music that a confident London danced to in the days of burgeoning internationalism, played with a tad too much sedate protocol.

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Related Links

Alison McGillivrayAlison McGillivray
Geminiani: Sonatas for Violoncello & Basso ContinuoGeminiani: Sonatas for Violoncello & Basso Continuo