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Handel's Messiah - Dunedin Consort - Classic FM Magazine


01 February 2007
Classic FM Magazine
Richard Lawrence
4 Stars

Another Messiah recording! How many do we need? After last month's versions of the two London revivals, here's a reconstruction of the premiere in Dublin - and it's very welcome. The soloists are drawn form the choir: or, rather, the choir is made up of soloists who are full-toned in the weighty passages as well as light and airy in the fast movements. The biggest textual surprise is the setting of ‘How beautiful are the feet' for two altos and chorus. Well sung though it is, it should have been assigned to the countertenors conspicuously absent from the ensemble. Otherwise, nothing but praise.
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