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Mozart in Vienna

Gottlieb Wallisch

Mozart in Vienna

...a selection of Mozart's best-loved works
CKD 352 (Linn Records)
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$22.00

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FLAC 16bit 44.1kHz 204.0MB $13.00

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Tracks: Listen and Download

Format
Track Time Listen
1
Sonata in D major, K.576 - I Allegro

Sonata in D major, K.576 - I Allegro

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
05:25 Play $3.40
2
Sonata in D major, K.576 - II Adagio

Sonata in D major, K.576 - II Adagio

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
05:15 Play $3.40
3
Sonata in D major, K.576 - III Allegretto

Sonata in D major, K.576 - III Allegretto

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
04:24 Play $1.70
4
Fantasy in D minor, K.397

Fantasy in D minor, K.397

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
05:39 Play $3.40
5
Sonata No.17 in B-flat major, K.570 - I Allegro

Sonata No.17 in B-flat major, K.570 - I Allegro

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
06:09 Play $3.40
6
Sonata No.17 in B-flat major, K.570 - II Adagio

Sonata No.17 in B-flat major, K.570 - II Adagio

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
08:01 Play $3.40
7
Sonata No.17 in B-flat major, K.570 - III Allegretto

Sonata No.17 in B-flat major, K.570 - III Allegretto

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
03:47 Play $1.70
8
Rondo in A minor, K.511

Rondo in A minor, K.511

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
09:31 Play $3.40
9
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Thema

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Thema

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:47 Play $1.70
10
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation I

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation I

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:42 Play $1.70
11
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation II

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation II

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:42 Play $1.70
12
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation III

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation III

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:49 Play $1.70
13
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation IV

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation IV

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:43 Play $1.70
14
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation V

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation V

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:54 Play $1.70
15
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation VI

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation VI

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:42 Play $1.70
16
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation VII

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation VII

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
00:45 Play $1.70
17
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation VIII

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation VIII

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
01:03 Play $1.70
18
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation IX

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation IX

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
03:17 Play $1.70
19
Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation X

Ten Variations in G major, K.455 - Variation X

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Soloist Gottlieb Wallisch - piano
02:31 Play $1.70
Total Running Time 61 minutes Purchase all tracks 
$13.00 
Prices shown in US Dollars

Austrian pianist Gottlieb Wallisch's debut on Linn Records, Mozart in Vienna, features a selection of Mozart's best-loved works, all composed in Vienna during one of the composer's most fruitful periods: 1781-1791.

The SACD layer is both 5.1 channel and 2-channel. The Studio Master files are 192 kHz or 88.2kHz / 24-bit.

Download includes - cover art, inlay, booklet
Gottlieb Wallisch

Gottlieb Wallisch

Gottlieb Wallisch is recognised internationally as one of the finest present day interpreters of the Viennese Piano tradition.
profile & recordings >>
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Mozart is one of the most enduringly popular classical composers. He is responsible for over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, piano, operatic, and choral music.
profile & recordings >>

Booklet Notes:

Click here to read booklet notes in German.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Vienna: a relationship that appears perfectly obvious and logical at first since Mozart
is widely regarded as the main protagonist of the Viennese Classical movement. Yet Mozart in Vienna encompasses a time
span of merely ten years from 1781 to his death in this city in 1791. Relocating to Vienna was important to Mozart in two aspects: he gained freedom from his feudalist chains as court organist and concertmaster for the Archbishop Hieronymus von Colloredo of Salzburg; and furthermore he was able to cut the umbilical chord to his father, Leopold Mozart. Now Mozart lived the life of an independent artist in Vienna, relieved of prior servile obligations. Another crucial step towards self-reliance was his marriage to Constanze Weber in Vienna in August 1782 at St. Stephan's Cathedral. But what was Mozart's actual motivation to move his life from his hometown Salzburg to Vienna?

Archbishop Colloredo travelled to Vienna in early 1781, and since he was keen on presenting himself in the most glamorous fashion, adorned with a force of servants and equipment, he also brought along some of his best musicians as part of his courtly entourage. Therefore Mozart, who was staying in Augsburg at the time, was summoned to Vienna in the middle of March. He complied immediately. The 'arch-rascal' had rejected Mozart's desire for a solo concert. Things became increasingly difficult, and two heated confrontations lead to the final discord with the Archbishop. Mozart quit his service in Salzburg on June 8th 1781 and settled in Vienna.

The start in Vienna was most promising: '...my good fortune is now about to begin', Mozart wrote to his father in Salzburg. 'P.S. I assure you this is a splendid place, and for my profession the best place in the world.' Mozart's 'profession': not only music in general, but the art of the piano in particular which here he was able to deliver to an abundance of students. '...My phase of art is so much liked here, that I feel I am on a sure basis. This is certainly the Pianoforte land!' He engaged in an almost manic productivity (nearly half his oeuvre originates from his ten Vienna years) and became increasingly established in Viennese society.

Mozart was an exceptionally gifted pianist. His pianistic battle with Muzio Clementi is in the history books of music: initiated by Emperor Joseph II. This musical showdown took place at the Vienna Hofburg on December 24th 1781. The combatants were required to perform their own works as well as prove their skills in sight-reading and free improvisation. Which pieces Mozart might have performed has not been accounted for; yet one could imagine him turning to a Fantasy on such an occasion, possibly similar to the Fantasy in D minor, K.397 which is included in this recording. This remarkably expressive and touching piece from 1782 resembles a miniature opera with its alternating arioso and recitative episodes. It is comprised of two parts: Adagio (d minor) and Allegretto (D major). Mozart left the piece unfinished by a few bars, the abrupt final chords were added later (presumably by August Eberhard Müller). The Fantasy in D minor is a splendid example of Mozart's command of improvisation, yet it is equally impressive in formal aspects by its coherence and the masterful framing of minor and major parts.

By 1783 Mozart had established himself in Vienna as a pianist, conductor and composer. He organised numerous concerts for himself, and in the first half of 1783 managed to host no less than six such 'academies'. In a letter to his father Mozart recounts his concert on March 23rd 1783: 'I need not tell you much about the success of my concert, for no doubt you have already heard of it. Suffice it to say that the theatre could not have been more crowded, and every box was full. What gratified me most was the Emperor being present, who gave me great applause.' The audience in the Old Court Theatre demanded an encore, '... so I played variations on the aria, "Unser dummer Pöbel meint", from The Pilgrimme von Mekka [by Gluck]'. This marks the origin of the Ten Variations in G Major, K. 455 which Mozart put to paper not until a year later in August 1784. An aria from Gluck's comic opera The Pilgrims from Mecca serves as the main theme: a dervish makes fun of the pious people gullibly trusting his Order's vow of poverty. Gluck's 'Turkish opera' was a popular piece in Vienna at that time and provided musical inspiration for Mozart's opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail. In his Ten Variations Mozart shrouds Gluck's witty plump melody in humorous counterpoint, daring harmonies, trills and shimmering soundscapes.

'Rondò di W. A. Mozart il 11 Marzo 1787' is the autograph inscription for a solitary piece of deep inner significance for Mozart. His Rondo in A minor, K. 511 came about in between the composition of Figaro and his new opera Don Giovanni. Mozart's public performances were on a steep decline. The Rondo signifies his turning away from the stage; it is an intimate piece of chamber music for solo piano, full of melancholy, poetry and confession. The different sections vary between the light and shadow of minor and major. A continuous 6/8 time signature suggests a Siciliano which appears transfigured and iridescent, a similar effect as in the F-sharp minor Adagio from his Piano Concerto in A Major, K. 488. The intense ascending chromatic line of the main theme dominates the course of events; two middle sections in F major and A major bring a hint of hope before the material is condensed into a coda of muted resignation. We get a deeper look into Mozart's soul in this passage from a letter to his father, written only three weeks later:

'As death (when closely considered) is the true goal of our life, I have made myself so thoroughly acquainted with this good and faithful friend of man, that not only has its image no longer anything alarming to me, but rather something most peaceful and consolatory; and I thank my heavenly Father that He has vouchsafed to grant me the happiness, and has given me the opportunity, (you understand me,) to learn that it is the hey to our true felicity. I never lie down at night without thinking that (young as I am) I may be no more before the next morning dawns. And yet not one of all those who know me can say that I ever was morose or melancholy in my intercourse with them. I daily thank my Creator for such a happy frame of mind, and wish from my heart that every one of my fellow-creatures may enjoy the same.'

At the end of the 18th century composers were widely interested in combining the old master's art of polyphony with their modern 'gallant' style. Trying to integrate the complex counterpoint techniques into an elegant and plain composition was the main challenge. Mozart accomplished this feat impressively in his last two sonatas, dating from 1789. Finished in February, the Sonata No. 17 in B-flat Major, K. 570 is the more sober of the two and represents a late style of utmost serenity. The two themes in the first movement are identical, therefore any dramatic contrast is eliminated. In return we get a development generously endowed with contrapuntal finesse, including double counterpoint. Thirds, fifths and sixths shape the second movement with their imitation of a noble vision, an atmosphere only disrupted by a sad solitary C minor section. The reductionist Rondo Finale comes along quite minimalist, evoking an oddly humorous mood that recalls final movements by Mozart's friend Joseph Haydn.

The same year Mozart was informed that the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm II was an avid cellist and entertained a luxurious court orchestra. Mozart did not hesitate and hoping for new means of income, he travelled to Potsdam to audition for the King. His Majesty's reaction has not been recorded. However it is for certain that Mozart received commissions for new pieces which he mentioned in a letter to his Freemason friend, Michael von Puchberg: '...meanwhile I am writing 6 easy Piano Sonatas for the Princess Friederika and 6 Quartets for the King, which I will order Kozeluch to print at my own expenses; besides I expect the 2 dedications to be profitable for me'. Only three of the six quartets were finished (K. 575, 589, 590) and only one of the six sonatas, his final sonata, Sonata in D Major, K. 576, which was completed in Vienna in July 1789. Mozart's intent of writing easy sonatas for the princess caused astonishment, since K.576 became his pianistically most demanding sonata. Commanding the technical difficulties without losing a light and playful sound is a challenging task in itself, but even more daunting is mastering its polyphonic style. In 1782, his friend Gottfried van Swieten had introduced Mozart to the works of Bach and Handel in Vienna and he continued to study them with great care and devotion. From this perspective the Sonata in D Major - even more so than the Sonata in B flat Major - presents itself as the solution for the compositional problems Mozart was dealing with at that time. The piece is mainly shaped in two-part linearity (resembling a suite by Bach) which Mozart works into one of his characteristically transparent compositions. In addition he creates space for lyrical moments: the Adagio's melody blossoms between the outer movements with a long and peaceful breath. © Gottlieb Wallisch, 2010 (Translation by Gero Mertens) 

Recorded at St George's, Bristol, UK: 5th-7th August 2009
Produced and engineered by Philip Hobbs
Post-production by Julia Thomas, Finesplice, UK
Design by John Haxby

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Buxton Advertiser
'...precise instrumental technique'
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The Consort
'expressive playing'
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Hifitest.de
'...ein heißer Tipp für Liebhaber erstklassigen Pianospiels.'
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Clavier Companion
"Wallisch superbly illuminates Mozart's craftsmanship..."
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Scotland on Sunday
5 Stars
"This expert recording of Mozart's music from his Vienna years comprises almost half his musical output."
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Wiener Zeitung
"Die Fangemeinde im gut besuchten Brahmssaal zeigte sich begeistert."
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Hi-Fi Critic
"...performances that search and express from within."
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International Record Review
"I look forward to hearing more from this young artist."
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MusicWeb International
"...confidently recommended."
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hi-fi+
5 Stars
"This is a disc that offers a true window into the genius of Mozart through exceptional talent."
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Audio Video Club of Atlanta
"...superbly interpreted by Wallisch."
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Kurier
5 Stars
"...hinreißenden, tief empfundenen Ausdruck."
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Audiophile Audition
5 Stars
"I can report that with Viennese-born Gottlieb Wallisch, we're in good hands."
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Classic FM Magazine
4½ Stars
"superbly recorded, deftly executed with a disarming and unaffected simplicity..."
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Fanfare
"His playing is a thing of rare beauty and a joy to behold...This is a must for all Mozart mavens."
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Sound and Music
"Dalle esecuzioni di Wallisch emergono una suprema eleganza formale e un delicato gusto umoristico che..."
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SA-CD.net
5 Stars
"The sound is one of the best representations of the piano on disc...Strongly recommended."
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The Scotsman
4 Stars
"...the overriding sense is of a young pianist on the verge of an interesting career."
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AudioVideoHD
4½ Stars
"Sin duda este es un interesante disco, muy recomendable para mozartianos y que seguro gustará a los amantes de la música clásica en general."
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Opus Musica
"Una grabación para deleitarse una y otra vez en su escucha."
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Piano News
"Neben den ausdrucksstark gespielten Sonaten B-Dur KV 570 und D-Dur KV 576 glänzt Wallisch mit einem farbenreichen Rondo a-Moll KV 511 und der transparent leuchtenden Fantasie d-Moll KV 397."
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