Shopping Cart

0 Items in Cart
Tastes of Europe: Telemann Trios & Quartets

Ensemble Meridiana

Tastes of Europe: Telemann Trios & Quartets

...a sparkling debut
CKD 368 (Linn Records)
Bookmark and Share

Compact Disc

$22.00

Studio Master (192)

FLAC 24bit 192kHz 2,640.0MB $24.00

Studio Master (192)

ALAC 24bit 192kHz 2,665.1MB $24.00

Studio Master

FLAC 24bit 88.2kHz 1,267.3MB $24.00

Studio Master

ALAC 24bit 88.2kHz 1,254.6MB $24.00

CD Quality

FLAC 16bit 44.1kHz 361.0MB $13.00

CD Quality

ALAC 16bit 44.1kHz 367.1MB $13.00

MP3

MP3 320k 44.1kHz 139.8MB $11.00
Prices shown in US Dollars



Listen

Tracks: Listen and Download

Format
Track Time Listen
1
Concerto in G Major for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:G6 - Allegro

Concerto in G Major for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:G6 - Allegro

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:38 Play $1.70
2
Concerto in G Major for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:G6 - Grave

Concerto in G Major for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:G6 - Grave

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:55 Play $1.70
3
Concerto in G Major for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:G6 - Allegro

Concerto in G Major for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:G6 - Allegro

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:51 Play $1.70
4
Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Tendrement

Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Tendrement

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
03:20 Play $1.70
5
Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Viste Gay

Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Viste Gay

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:42 Play $1.70
6
Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Grave

Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Grave

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
03:04 Play $1.70
7
Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Allegrement

Trio in E minor for two "dessus" and basso continuo, TWV. 42:e11 - Allegrement

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
03:36 Play $1.70
8
Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Mesto

Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Mesto

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:40 Play $1.70
9
Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Allegro

Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Allegro

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
03:20 Play $1.70
10
Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Andante

Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Andante

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
03:12 Play $1.70
11
Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Vivace

Trio 3 in G minor for oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 42:g5 - Vivace

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:44 Play $1.70
12
Trio 7 in F Major for recorder, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:F3 - Vivace

Trio 7 in F Major for recorder, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:F3 - Vivace

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:50 Play $1.70
13
Trio 7 in F Major for recorder, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:F3 - Mesto

Trio 7 in F Major for recorder, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:F3 - Mesto

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:23 Play $1.70
14
Trio 7 in F Major for recorder, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:F3 - Allegro

Trio 7 in F Major for recorder, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:F3 - Allegro

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:35 Play $1.70
15
Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Adagio

Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Adagio

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:49 Play $1.70
16
Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Allegro

Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Allegro

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:42 Play $1.70
17
Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Adagio

Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Adagio

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:36 Play $1.70
18
Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Vivace

Concerto in A minor for recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo, TWV. 43:a3 - Vivace

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
04:12 Play $1.70
19
Trio in B minor for violin, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:h6 - Largo

Trio in B minor for violin, viola da gamba and basso continuo, TWV. 42:h6 - Largo

Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Band Ensemble Meridiana
03:10 Play $1.70
20
Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Allegro

Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Allegro

Composer

Pierre Prowo (1697-1757)

Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:23 Play $1.70
21
Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Adagio

Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Adagio

Composer

Pierre Prowo (1697-1757)

Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:54 Play $1.70
22
Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Allegro

Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Allegro

Composer

Pierre Prowo (1697-1757)

Band Ensemble Meridiana
02:40 Play $1.70
23
Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Presto

Trio in D minor for recorder, violin and basso continuo - Presto

Composer

Pierre Prowo (1697-1757)

Band Ensemble Meridiana
01:50 Play $1.70
Total Running Time 60 minutes Purchase all tracks 
$13.00 
Prices shown in US Dollars

The debut recording by the award-winning Ensemble Meridiana.  A scintillating programme of Telemann leading the listener on a musical jouney through Europe in the Baroque period.

The SACD layer is both 5.1 channel and 2-channel. The Studio Master files are 192kHz or 88.2kHz / 24-bit.

Download includes - cover art, inlay, booklet

On this beautiful recording, Ensemble Meridiana explores a variety of Georg Philipp Telemann's chamber music.  The pieces chosen highlight the mastery of Telemann's 'mixed taste' writing style and are a perfect display of Baroque influences from France, Germany, Italy and Poland.  The ensemble's playing is energetic, vibrant and displays a soft touch which is ideal for interweaving the various mixed tastes within these compositions.

Also featured on this album is a recording only recently discovered not to have been composed by Telemann, but by Pierre Prowo!

Dominique Tinguely recorder & bassoon
Sarah Humphrys oboe
Sabine Stoffe violin
Tore Eketorp viola da gamba
Christian Kjos harpsichord

Recorded at the National Centre for Early Music, St Margaret's Church, Walmgate, York, UK on 5-8th March 2010
Recorded, produced and mixed by Philip Hobbs
Post-production by Julia Thomas, Finesplice, UK
Photography by Jim Poyner and Theodoro da Silva
Sleeve design by John Haxby

Booklet Notes:

The National Styles
‘Good German hard work, Italian gallantry and French fire together do the best.' (Johann Adolph Scheibe)

If we compare present-day interconnected Europe with the communication and travel opportunities available 300 years ago, then the earlier cultural exchanges among different nations were amazing. Precisely because of these challenging conditions, events across the border were all the more interesting. Scholars, artists and nobles took trips abroad and brought back news and the latest novelties to their own courts. Musicians and composers were full of curiosity about the ‘exotic' styles abroad; the different national styles of composition were studied with great interest as well as discussed and criticised in wide-ranging debates.

The two main styles of the first half of the 18th century were the Italian and French styles pioneered by Corelli and Lully. Certain characteristics have been associated with these two different styles. German composer Johann Mattheson described the Italian style as sharp, colourful and expressive, and the established professional flute player and composer Johann Joachim Quantz described it as somewhat bizarre, cheeky, stilted, heavy in the execution, overdone, very formal and more startling than enjoyable.   

The French style on the other hand is described by Mattheson as natural, flowing and tender. Telemann referred to it as easy cheerfulness, spirited, singing and harmony.   And lastly, Quantz described French music as lively, expressive, pleasing, approachable, clear, nice and clean in recital, yet neither profound nor daring; but it is very restrained, slavishly following convention and always similar to itself. 

In contrast, the German music defined itself as the new so-called 'mixed taste'.  Quantz described it as follows in his Versuch einer Anleitung die Flöte traversiere zu spielen:

‘If you were to choose - with good judgment - the best taste in music from different nations, so it creates a mixed taste, which one (...) could very well call a German taste; not only because the Germans happened upon it first, but also because it has been taking root at various locations in Germany for many years, and still flourishes, while it does not displease either in Italy or in France, or in [any] other countries.'

Johann Adolf Scheibe wrote in his Der Critische Musikus that German music is only different from foreign music ‘through hard work, regular execution of the movements and because of the intricacies of its harmonies'.

Georg Philipp Telemann and the Mixed Taste
‘It is admirable that Telemann uses almost every genre of music as well as music from all nations emphatically, yet with a light touch and without confusing or spoiling his taste, which always remains beautiful, exquisite and consistent.' (Scheibe)

Georg Philipp Telemann played a significant role in the development of the mixed taste. Even though he never left the German region - apart from a trip to France - the national styles were well known to him through the exchanges at the German courts.  From Hildesheim, he travelled to the courts of Hannover and Braunschweig, where he became acquainted with the latest styles of composition. He wrote in his autobiography in 1740 about ‘the two adjacent court orchestras, of Hannover and Braunschweig, where I attended special religious festivals and all church services among other visits, which gave me the opportunity to acquaint myself with both the French and theatrical style of composition; however, at both I got the chance to get to know the Italian [form] better and learned to make a distinction.'  During his early years he used the works of Steffani, Rosenmüller, Corelli and Caldara as his Italian models.

During his years of study in Leipzig (1701-1705), Johann Kuhnau's works were a guide for him on fugues and the use of counterpoint. With his Collegium Musicum, he travelled to different courts and met members of the modern Dresden court orchestra, ‘where the refinement of the Italian and the spiritedness of the French comes together' (Telemann).

Inspired by the splendid court in Sorau and equipped with the latest fashions, he intensively studied the music of Lully and Campra as Kappellmeister from 1705. In Sorau, as well as on trips to Krakow and Pless, he got to know Polish music. Above all, he was mainly concerned with folk music, which he learned from musicians in the common inns.

During his subsequent jobs as Konzertmeister and Hofkappellmeister in Eisenach (1708-1712), he again worked with the French style. The orchestra there was fashioned after a French example and in his opinion, surpassed even the Paris Opera Orchestra. He continued studying the works of Italian composers such as Corelli, Albinoni and Vivaldi and their concert forms, despite the French influences.

From Frankfurt, Telemann travelled to the Dresden court in 1719, the stronghold of the mixed taste. During his years in Hamburg and until his death, he refined this further and further. Georg Philipp Telemann integrated the best of the German, French, Italian and Polish styles in his compositions. Some movements and works reveal the influence of one nation more than the others. Thus, some compositions are very inspired by the French goût, others are dressed ‘in an Italian suit' (Telemann), and some movements sound like Polish folk music. 

Telemann captured the sentiment of the times with his music. His works were popular with professional musicians as well as with amateurs. He knew how to market himself, and successfully sold printed scores throughout Europe.  Telemann had subscribers in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy, England, Spain, Norway, Denmark, Switzerland and the Baltic States.  These advocates included support from fellow composers and musicians such as J.S. Bach, Pisendel, Quantz, Handel and Blavet; all of whom were supplied with copies of Telemann's compositions.

Telemann's Chamber Music

Judging by the large number of printed scores and manuscripts, Telemann's chamber music was undoubtedly the biggest success amongst his instrumental works. His trio and quartet sonatas were praised by Mattheson, Scheibe, Quantz, Marpurg and Agricola as representative examples of their kind. The combination of instruments within these works is remarkably varied.  Telemann played a number of instruments including the recorder, violin, keyboards, flute, oboe, chalumeau, viola da gamba, double bass and bass trombone.  As a result, the individual voices in his trio and quartet sonatas were often written to suit the respective instrument perfectly.

Telemann referred to his trios as his ‘greatest strength'. He wrote in his autobiography in 1740:

‘And how would it be possible to remember all I invented for string and wind instruments? I focused on writing trios and arranged it such that the second part appeared to be the first, and the bass voice carried a natural melody, close-knit with harmonies where each note has to be just so and cannot be any different.  They wanted to flatter me that I had shown this to be my best craft.'

The wide variety of works gathered on this album represents a selection of Telemann's best chamber music.

The earliest and most obviously French work is the Trio in E minor (TWV. 42: e11). It is one of ‘Telemann's trios set in the French taste', which Quantz recommended for study in 1752 in his Versuch einer Anweisung die Flöte traversiere zu spielen.  Excerpts from this trio are used as score examples in Quantz's Solfeggi titled ‘Trio alla Frances. Di Telemann'. Quantz was not the only one who admired Telemann's French style of composition. Mattheson wrote in his Der volkommene Capellmeister that: ‘Herr Capellmeister Telemann deserves such praise because his trios, though some Italian [influence] is mixed in, flow very naturally and in a very French manner.  One encounters things by him [Telemann] of which even Lully himself would not be ashamed of, which is even more remarkable since the latter never concealed his country's style.'  Scheibe even wrote that Telemann, ‘As an imitator of the French has at last surpassed those foreigners in their own national music'.

The two upper voices (dessus) are written in the French violin clef according to French tradition. The trio is in the form of the Italian sonata da chiesa, however the individual movements have French tempo directions. The first movement Tendrement is full of French agréments: tierces coulées, ports de voix and tremblements. The fast movements are in French dance forms: binary rigaudon and passepied form, with a petite reprise in the last movement.  They ‘smell of France' (Telemann).

Both Trio 3 in G minor and Trio 7 in F Major belong to the Essercizii musici, a collection of solo and trio pieces. Even though these were published in print around 1740, manuscripts were already in circulation during the 1720s.  Even more so than in the French trio, here the stylistic elements melt together in the individual movements.  At this point the mixed taste reaches its early climax.  In the third movement of the Trio 3 in G minor (TWV. 42: g5), the instruments become singers of an (Italian) aria, whose middle Largo section is embedded in the Andante reprised at the end. The dance of the last movement is a minuet in rondo form.  Trio 7 in F Major (TWV. 42: F3) is the only trio in this collection consisting of three rather than four movements. The two fast movements already show gallant characteristics.  These are however, interrupted by the introverted Mesto in the stile antico.

Telemann's quartets occupy a very special place in his chamber music. As one of the first to do so among German composers, he developed this genre and impressed musicians and theorists alike. The two quartets recorded here for the recorder, oboe, violin and basso continuo are preserved in manuscripts and originated around 1730. These are the first examples of the trendsetting Sonate auf Concertenart: a hybrid between the sonata and the Italian concerto.  The fourth movement of the Concerto in A minor (TWV. 43: a3) is one of the best examples of Sonate auf Concertenart -  the ritornello form in the style of Vivaldi blends with that of a rondo in concerto form - virtuoso solos and orchestral tutti occur in turn.  The fugue of the second movement of this concerto is the only one in Telemann's quartets that is composed for four voices. It consists entirely of fugue material and its three motifs weave a dense texture. This contrapuntal intensity acts as a counterweight to the fourth movement in concerto form and reflects Telemann's command of the German art of the fugue.

The lively Trio in D minor (TWV. 42: d10) with its fourth movement in the Polish style would have been a wonderful example of Telemann's interweaving of Polish folk music in its ‘true barbaric beauty' (Telemann) had it not recently been discovered that this trio was not composed by him after all!  The work has been correctly credited to the organist Pierre Prowo (1697-1757), working in Hamburg-Altona (K. Hofmann, Tibia 1/2010). Prowo, who lived in Telemann's immediate sphere of influence and was especially interested in his chamber music, created an original, spirited work.  This work will now find a new identity between an enduring TWV. number, its Telemann flair and its mixed taste style.

© 2011 Dominique Tinguely

Booklet Notes in German:

Die Nationalstile
‘Eine gute fleissige Deutsche Arbeit, Italiänische Galanterie und Französisches Feuer thun dabey das beste.' 1

Vergleichen wir ein heutiges in sämtlichen Bereichen vernetztes Europa mit den Kommunikations- und Reisemöglichkeiten vor 300 Jahren, so ist der damalige Kulturaustausch unter den verschiedenen Nationen erstaunlich. Gerade durch die erschwerten Bedingungen wurde das Geschehen jenseits der Grenzen umso interessanter. Die neusten Moden an den europäischen Höfen waren stilbildend. Gelehrte, Künstler und Adlige unternahmen Reisen ins Ausland und brachten die Neuheiten mit zurück an ihren eigenen Hof. Auch Musiker und Komponisten waren voller Neugier auf ‘Exotisches' von ausserhalb. Die verschiedenen nationalen Kompositionsstile wurden voller Interesse studiert und in ausschweifenden Debatten diskutiert und kritisiert.

Die beiden wichtigsten Stilrichtungen in der ersten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts waren der italienische und der französische Stil mit ihren Übervätern Corelli und Lully. Bestimmte Charakteristiken wurden mit den einzelnen Stilen in Verbindung gebracht.

Mattheson beschreibt den italienischen Stil als ‘scharff, bunt und ausdrückend', Quantz bezeichnet ihn als ‘etwas bizarr', ‘frech', ‘gekünstelt', ‘schwer in der Ausübung', ‘mit viel Zusatz an Manieren' und ‘mehr Verwunderung erweckend als Gefallen'.

Dem gegenüber ist der französische Stil Mattheson zu Folge ‘natürlich, fliessend, zärtlich'. Telemann spricht hier von ‘ungezwung'ner Munterkeit', ‘Lebhafftigkeit', ‘Gesang und Harmonie' und für Quantz ist französische Musik ‘lebhaft, ausdrückend, gefällig und begreiflich', ‘deutlich, nett und reinlich im Vortrage', ‘aber weder tiefsinnig noch kühn; sondern sehr eingeschränket, sklavisch, sich selbst immer ähnlich'.

Die deutsche Musik definierte sich dagegen durch den neuen sogenannten ‘vermischten Geschmack'. Quantz beschreibt diesen folgendermassen: ‘Wenn man aus verschiedener Völker ihrem Geschmacke in der Music, mit gehöriger Beurtheilung, das Beste zu wählen weis: so fliesst daraus ein vermischter Geschmack, welchen man (...) sehr wohl deutschen Geschmack nennen könnte: nicht allein weil die Deutschen zuerst darauf gefallen sind; sondern auch, weil er schon seit vielen Jahren, an unterschiedenen Orten Deutschlands, eingeführt worden ist, und noch blühet, auch weder in Italien, noch in Frankreich, noch in andern Ländern, misfällt.' 2

Nach Johann Adolf Scheibe unterscheidet sich die deutsche Musik von der ausländischen ‘nur durch eine fleissige Arbeit, regelmässige Ausführung der Sätze und durch die Tiefsinnigkeit, die sie in der Harmonie anwendet.' 3

Georg Philipp Telemann und der ‘vermischte Geschmack'
‘Zu verwundern ist es, dass Telemann fast alle Gattungen der musikalischen Stücke so wohl, als die Musikarten aller Nationen, mit einerley Leichtigkeit und Nachdruck ausübet, ohne seinen Geschmack im geringsten zu verwirren oder zu verderben, als welcher allemal schön, vortrefflich, und eben derselbe bleibt.' 4

Georg Philipp Telemann spielte eine bedeutende Rolle in der Entwicklung des ‘vermischten Geschmacks'. Obwohl er den deutschen Raum - abgesehen von seiner  Frankreichreise - nie verliess, waren ihm die Nationalstile durch den Austausch an den deutschen Höfen bestens bekannt.

Von Hildesheim aus reiste er an die Höfe von Hannover und Braunschweig, wo er die neusten Kompositionsstile kennen lernte. Er schreibt in seiner Autobiographie 1740 darüber: ‘Die zwo benachbarten Capellen, zu Hanover und Braunschweig, die ich bey besonderen Festen, bey allen Messen, und sonst mehrmahls besuchte, gaben mir Gelegenheit, dort die frantzösische Schreibart, und hier die theatralische; bey beiden aber überhaupt die italiänische näher kennen, und unterscheiden zu lernen.' Als italienische Modelle in jungen Jahren nennt er Werke von Steffani, Rosenmüller, Corelli und Caldara.

Während seiner Studienjahre in Leipzig (1701-1705) dienten ihm Johann Kuhnaus Werke ‘zur Nachfolge in Fugen und Contrapuncten'. Mit seinem ‘Collegium musicum' reiste er an verschiedene Höfe und kam mit Mitgliedern der modernen Dresdener Hofkappelle in Kontakt, ‘bei denen die Delicatesse Welschlandes und Franckreichs Lebhafftigkeit als in einem Mittel-Puncte zusammen kommt'. (Telemann)

Inspiriert durch den nach neuster Mode ausgestatteten, glanzvollen Hof in Sorau, setzte er sich ab 1705 als dortiger Kappellmeister intensiv mit Musik von Lully und Campra auseinander.

In Sorau, wie auch auf Reisen nach Krakau und Pless, lernte er die polnische Musik kennen. Es handelte sich hier vor allem um Volksmusik, die er durch Musikanten in den ‘gemeinen Wirthshäusern' kennen lernte.

Während der anschliessenden Tätigkeit als Konzert- und Hofkappellmeister in Eisenach (1708-1712) beschäftigte er sich wiederum mit dem französischen Stil, war die dortige Kapelle doch nach französischem Beispiel eingerichtet und übertraf seiner Meinung nach selbst das Pariser Opernorchester. Die Studien der Werke italienischer Komponisten wie Corelli, Albinoni und Vivaldi und deren Konzertformen setzte er trotz französischer Einwirkung fort.

Von Frankfurt aus reiste Telemann 1719 an den Dresdener Hof, die Hochburg des ‘vermischten Geschmacks'. In seinen Jahren in Hamburg und bis zu seinem Tode verfeinerte er diesen immer weiter.Georg Philipp Telemann integrierte ‘das Beste' des deutschen, französischen, italienischen und polnischen Stils in seine Kompositionen. Manche Sätze und Werke lassen eine Nation mehr durchschimmern als andere. So sind einige Kompositionen ganz dem französischen ‘goût' nachempfunden, andere sind ‘in einen italiänischen Rock' gekleidet (Telemann), und manch ein Satz klingt nach polnischer Volksmusik.

Telemann traf mit seiner Musik den Zeitgeist. Seine Werke waren sowohl bei professionellen Musikern als auch bei Amateuren beliebt. Er wusste sich zu verkaufen und vermarktete seine Drucke finanziell erfolgreich in ganz Europa. Subskribenten in Holland, Belgien Frankreich, Italien, England, Spanien, Norwegen, Dänemark, in der Schweiz und den Baltischen Staaten wurden mit seinen Ensemble-Kompositionen beliefert, so auch J.S. Bach, Pisendel, Quantz, Händel und Blavet.

Telemanns Kammermusik

Der grossen Anzahl gedruckter und handschriftlicher Quellen zu Folge feierte Telemanns Kammermusik zweifellos den grössten Erfolg unter seinen Instrumentalwerken. Seine Trio- und Quartett-Sonaten wurden von Mattheson, Scheibe, Quantz, Marpurg und Agricola als repräsentative Beispiele ihrer Gattung gepriesen. Die Kombination verschiedener Instrumente ist in diesen sehr vielfältig. Die einzelnen Stimmen sind den Instrumenten häufig regelrecht auf den Leib geschrieben. Selber spielte Telemann Blockflöte, Violine, Tasteninstrumente, Traversflöte, Oboe, Chalumeau, Viola da gamba, Kontrabass und Bassposaune.

Telemann selbst bezeichnete seine Trios als seine ‘beste Stärcke'. Er schreibt in seiner Autobiographie 1740: ‘Und wie wäre es möglich, mich allesdessen zu erinnern, was ich zum Geigen und Blasen erfunden? Aufs Triomachen legte ich mich hier insbesondere, und richtete es so ein, dass die zwote Partie die erste zu seyn schien, und der Bass in natürlicher Melodie, und in einer zu jenen nahe tretenden Harmonie, deren jeder Ton also, und nicht anders seyn konnte, einhergieng. Man wollte mir schmaicheln, dass ich hierin meine beste Krafft gezeiget hätte.'

Die auf dieser CD versammelten Werke stellen eine Auswahl von Telemanns Kammermusik dar, welche für die verschiedenen Instrumentenkombinationen des Ensemble Meridiana möglich ist.

Das frühste und offensichtlich französischste Werk ist dabei das Trio in e-moll (42:e11). Es ist eines von ‘Telemanns, im französischen Geschmack gesetzte Trios', die Quantz 1752 in seinem Versuch einer Anweisung die Flöte traversiere zu spielen zum Studium empfiehlt. Ausschnitte dieses Trios befinden sich auch als Notenbeispiele in Quantz's Solfeggi unter dem Titel ‘Trio alla Frances. Di Telemann'. Nicht nur Quantz schätzte Telemanns französischen Kompositionsstil. Mattheson schreibt: ‘Der Herr Capellmeister Telemann verdienet solches Lob vielmehr, weil seine Trio, wenn gleich etwas welsches mit eingemischet wird, doch sehr natürlich und alfrantzösisch fliessen. Man siehet von ihm Sachen dieser Gattung, deren sich wahrlich Lully selbst, zumahl da er auch seines Landes-Art nicht verbarg, keines Weges zu schämen hätte.' 5 Scheibe schreibt sogar, Telemann ‘habe als Nachahmer der Franzosen endlich diese Ausländer selbst in ihrer Nationalmusik übertroffen'. 6

Die zwei Oberstimmen („dessus') sind gemäss französischer Tradition im französischen Violinschlüssel geschrieben. Das Trio steht in der Form der italienischen Sonata da chiesa, die Satzbezeichnungen sind aber französische Tempoindikationen. Der erste Satz ‘Tendrement' ist voller französischer ‘agréments': ‘tierces coulées', ‘ports de voix' und ‘tremblements'. Die schnellen Sätze stehen in französischen Tanzformen, der binären Rigaudon- und Passepied-Form, mit einer ‘petite reprise' im letzten Satz. Es ‘riecht nach Frankreich' (Telemann).

Die beiden Trios 3 in g-moll und 7 in F-Dur gehören den Essercizii musici, einer Sammlung von Solo- und Trio-Stücken, an. Obwohl diese um 1740 als Druck herausgegeben wurden, waren bereits in den 1720er Jahren handschriftliche Überlieferungen der Trios im Umlauf. Viel mehr als im französischen Trio verschmelzen hier die stilistischen Elemente auch innerhalb der einzelnen Sätze. Der ‘vermischten Geschmack' erfährt seinen frühen Höhepunkt.

Im 3. Satz des Trio 3 in g-moll (TWV 42:g5) werden die Instrumente zu Sängern einer (italienischen) Arie, deren Mittelteil ‘Largo' in das am Schluss wiederkehrende „Andante' eingebettet ist. Der tänzerische letzte Satz ist im 3/8-Takt eines Menuetts und in Rondeau-Form komponiert.

Das Trio 7 in F-Dur (TWV 42:F3) besteht als einziges Trio dieser Sammlung aus drei statt vier Sätzen. Die zwei schnellen Sätze weisen bereits galante Charakteristiken auf. Diese werden jedoch durch das in sich gekehrte ‘Mesto' im ‘Stile Antico' unterbrochen.

Telemanns Quartette nehmen einen ganz besonderen Platz in seiner Kammermusik ein. Als einer der ersten deutschen Komponisten beschäftigte er sich mit dieser Gattung und beeindruckte damit Musiker und Theoretiker gleichermassen.  Die beiden hier eingespielten Quartette für Blockflöte, Oboe, Violine und Basso continuo sind beide in Handschriften überliefert und entstanden um 1730. Es sind erste Beispiele der zukunftsweisenden ‘Sonate auf Concertenart', einer Mischform zwischen der Sonate und dem italienischen Konzert.

Der 4. Satz des Concerto in a-moll (TWV 43:a3) ist eines der besten Satz-Beispiele einer ‘Sonate auf Concertenart': Die Ritornello-Form im Stile Vivaldis vermischt sich hier mit der eines konzertanten Rondeaus - virtuoses Solo- und orchestrales Tutti-Spiel erscheinen im Wechselspiel.

Die Fuge des 2. Satzes dieses Concertos ist die einzige in Telemanns Quartetten, die durch vier Stimmen durchkomponiert ist. Sie besteht gänzlich aus Fugen-Material und verarbeitet drei Motive auf dichte Weise. Diese kontrapunktische Intensität bildet ein Gegengewicht zum konzertanten 4. Satz und spiegelt Telemanns Fähigkeiten in der deutschen Fugenkunst wider.

Das lebhafte Trio in d-moll (TWV 42:d10) wäre mit seinem 4. Satz im polnischen Stil ein wunderbares Beispiel für Telemanns Einflechtung polnischer Volksmusik in ihrer ‘wahren barbarischen Schönheit', wäre man nicht kürzlich zur Erkenntnis gekommen, dass dieses Trio nicht von ihm komponiert wurde! Das Werk konnte zweifelsfrei dem in Altona tätigen Organisten Pierre Prowo (1697-1757) zugeschrieben werden (K. Hofmann, Tibia 1/2010). Pierre Prowo, der in Telemanns unmittelbarem Einflussbereich lebte und sich besonders für dessen Kammermusik interessierte, hat hier ein originelles, temperamentvolles Werk geschaffen. Dieses wird sich nun eine neue Identität inmitten haftender TWV-Nummer, Telemann'schem Flair und ‘vermischtem Geschmack' suchen.

© 2011 Dominique Tinguely


1          Johann Adolph Scheibe: Compendium Musices theoretico-practicum, Leipzig 1730
2          Johann Joachim Quantz: Versuch einer Anleitung, die Flöte traversiere zu spielen, Berlin 1752
3 4 6    Johann Adolf Scheibe: Der Critische Musikus, Leipzig 1745
5          Johann Mattheson: Der vollkommene Capellmeister, Hamburg 1739

Ensemble Meridiana in residence at Festival
01 March 2012
Ensemble Meridiana will be in residence for the whole 2012 Sligo Festival of Baroque Music.
more >>

Competition Winners Win Again!
04 February 2011
First Prize in the German Handel competition
more >>

Be the first to add a customer recommendation.

Please Login or Register to write a customer recommendation.
The Consort
'The youthful exuberance of the playing combined with sensitivity, highly polished technique, and excellent articulation as an ensemble -makes this a very appealing CD.'
more >>

SA-CD.net
5 Stars
'Extremely highly recommended.'
more >>

musica Dei donum
'...an outstanding disc.'
more >>

Positive Feedback Online
'...the performances are easily top notch...'
more >>

American Record Guide
'...vivacious chamber trios...'
more >>

Musical Pointers
'Recommended'
more >>

pizzicato

more >>

Early Music Today
'...the group's interpretation of these trios and quartets is astoundingly good and well worth a listen.'
more >>

ClassicsToday.com
'...here is a fine collection of five trios and two quartets...'
more >>

Sonograma Magazine
'...the significant contribution of Ensemble Meridiana is imaginative, dynamic and above all, well played.'
more >>

Venerdì di Repubblica
"...Ensemble Meridiana...expresses the great beauty of Telemann's style"
more >>

Klassik.com
4 Stars
'Their engaging playing, the bright, clear sound of the ensemble and the natural beauty of the phrasing make this debut album a very worth-listening experience. '
more >>

Audiophile Audition
5 Stars
'They play with style, energy, and conviction; by any measure, this is lovely ensemble and solo playing.'
more >>

The Irish Times
"...they play with real spirit and zest..."
more >>

Early Music Review
'...one of the most impressive debut CDs that I have ever heard.'
more >>

Early Music Review
'Stylishly played on period instruments...'
more >>

International Record Review
'...expressively relaxed playing...'
more >>

MusicWeb International
"60 minutes of sheer delight."
more >>

Droitwich Spa Advertiser
"particularly impressive...[a] sparkling Linn recital."
more >>

Southern California Early Music Society
"Telemann has resurfaced on a gorgeous new release...they play like angels."
more >>

Audio Video Club of Atlanta
'The performances sparkle with the youthful excitement of discovery.'
more >>

Kidderminster Shuttle
"The four "Trios" are particularly impressive, proving the highlights of this sparkling Linn recital."
more >>

The Early Music Show
'...an energetic opening - a playful dialogue between the recorder and the violin...'
more >>

28 April 2014 to 28 April 2014
Europe
Konzert Theater, BernSwitzerland, Europe
KammermusikreiheBerner Symphonie Orchester,

18 July 2014 to 25 July 2014
Europe
Sastamala Old Church, Sastamala, Finland, Europe
Sastamala Gregoriana