Related Reviews
Choral Journal
"They play with stylish vigor..."
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High Fidelity (Poland)
5 Stars
An outstanding review from the Polish publication
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The Berkshire Review
Superb
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SA-CD.net
5 Stars
Highly recommended - indeed, this version is probably the first choice for this ever popular work.
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Inverness Courier
The Consort deliver a fresh and hugely enjoyable perspective on the music
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Classic FM Magazine
4 Stars
...nothing but praise
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Allmusic.com
5 Stars
ALBUM OF THE DAY - One of the most compelling and engaging Messiahs on disc.
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Atlanta Audio Society Newsletter
An additional plus is the excellent diction of these singers (should that surprise us about the Scots?). This is one time when you don't need to have the booklet firmly in hand in order to understand an oratorio in English!
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The Times
4 Stars
the real highlights are the choruses
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The Guardian
4 Stars
an authoritative bass in Matthew Brook, and a superb contralto (one of three) in Clare Wilkinson, whose heart-stopping delivery of the words "And ye shall find rest unto your souls," sets the tone for the whole performance.
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Bloomberg.com
...one of the most intimate "Messiahs" available.
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The Sunday Telegraph
The playing of the Dunedin Players under John Butt is admirably crisp, and the singing of the Consort disciplined and clear in enunciation.
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Gramophone Magazine
The freshest, most natural, revelatory and transparently joyful Messiah I have heard for a very long time.
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BBC Music Magazine
4 Stars
Stylish, fresh and more intimate.
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Handel's Messiah - The Scotsman


24 November 2006
The Scotsman
Ken Walton

Choosing a recording of Handel's Messiah hasn't got any easier, thanks to the current spate of new releases on the market [including] the much-anticipated recreation of Handel's original 1742 Dublin premiere by the Edinburgh-based Dunedin Consort, under John Butt's direction. Butt's Dunedin version bases its dimensions and configuration of movements on the 1742 premiere, which Handel directed in Dublin. Butt calls it "a little concert version", featuring a mere dozen singers and miniature orchestra of only strings, trumpets and timpani. It is riveting. Balance is never a problem with Dunedin's radiant and intimate recording: its Hallelujah chorus sturdy, effortless and exultant; its small band of singers, from which the soloists emerge, perfectly matched. In the final reckoning, if I had to make a choice between recordings, my money would go on Dunedin's Messiah. It has a genuine sparkle which lifts Handel's music above the ordinary, and a fresh angle for just about every moment.


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