Related Reviews
Opus
Opus d'Or Award: '...a magnificent lesson on baroque poetry...'
more >>
BBC Music Magazine
'...irresistible energy.'
more >>
Audiophile Audition
5 Stars
'Retrospect Trio, who play with style and verve galore...First-rate in every way.'
more >>
BBC Music Magazine
5 Stars
Chamber Disc of the Month: 'The Retrospect Trio speak the language of Purcell as if it was their mother tongue.'
more >>
allmusic.com
4½ Stars
'The ensemble's sound is exquisite, and the pair of violinists and the basso continuo of bass viol and harpsichord or organ produce a vibrant blend that gleams with authentic period sonorities and ornamentation.'
more >>
The Sunday Times
'Entrancing'
more >>
Early Music Review
'...the best recording of these works I have ever heard...'
more >>
International Record Review
IRR Outstanding Award: 'This is an utterly delightful disc.'
more >>
MusicWeb International
'Now they complete the set with the three-part works, in which they are just as recommendable if not even more so.'
more >>
The Irish Times
5 Stars
'The sonatas are among the best you'll find...'
more >>
tommanoff.com
'...the conductor is an exceptional interpreter of [Purcell's] music.'
more >>

Purcell: Twelve Sonatas in Three Parts - Gramophone


01 December 2011
Gramophone
David Vickers

To read the plain text of this review, click here

CKD 374 Gramophone Review
 
 

Delightful performances that revel in Purcell's rich harmonies

Purcell published his collection of a dozen trio sonatas in 1683, and in the preface remarked that he 'faithfully endeavour'd a just imitation of the most fam'd Italian Masters'. In his booklet-note Mathew Halls observes that the famed Italians who influenced these sonatas were probably Corelli and obscurer figures such as Colista, Cazzati, Vitali, Bassani, Bertali and Matteis, but also explains how Purcell incorporated French elements and his own Englishness into proceedings. Purcell declared that he attempted 'to bring the seriousness and gravity of that Sort of Musick into vogue' and hoped that 'his labours will Seem neither unpleasant, nor unprofitable'. It is thus fitting that the Retrospect Trio (ie quartet) plays with ample seriousness, gravity, pleasantness and, hopefully, profit.

As with their previous volume of Purcell sonatas (9/09), the first and second violin duties are shared democratically between Sophie Gent and Matthew Truscott; they engage in fluent dialogues with Jonathan Manson's conversational bass viol, and Hall's keyboard continuo realisations are flawlessly nimble and subtle. Whether Purcell's brief movements are slow (the rapturous opening of No.6), quick (the fleeting Allegro that concludes No.2) or moderate (the dance-like Poco largo of No.12), these performances convey rhetorical suggestions of speaking intimately, unforced breathing, and listening attentively. The Retrospect Trio achieves rich sonorities when Purcell springs extraordinary harmonic surprises, such as the dizzying chromatic sequence in the Adagio of No.3 melancholic C minor passages throughout No.9. These delightful endeavours should win plenty of friends.


Bookmark and Share


Related Links

Retrospect TrioRetrospect Trio
Twelve Sonatas in Three PartsTwelve Sonatas in Three Parts