Related Reviews
The New York Observer
"Her appearances in New York are rare. Don't even think about missing this one."
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Wolf Entertainment Guide
Martin was mesmerizing...she consistently sparkles
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New York Times
beautifully acted interpretations
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New York Times
"Ms. Martin's subtle, beautifully acted interpretations give them [the songs] their due. "
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The Times
together they make a stylish combination
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The Stage
A relaxed duo offering up a delightful selection of songs
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All About Jazz website
One of my favorite jazz vocalists.
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The Times
The most intelligent and assured singer in the country.
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Jazz Times
For my money she's not only the finest female British jazz singer of her generation but possibly of all time.
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www.jazzreview.com
A delightful union of two of the UK's most recognized talents.
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Atlanta Audio Society
This Linn SACD was a revelation for me.
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Evening Standard
In lively form.
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Birmingham Post
Jazz CD of the Week
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Good Sound Magazine
One of the best jazz singers around.
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Audiophile Audition
Very, very highly recommended!
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The Sunday Times
As polished as you could hope for.
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Yorkshire Post
There isn’t a better singer than (Claire Martin) around.
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The Sunday Post
As always with Linn, the recording sounds fantastic.
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Scotland on Sunday
Order this CD pronto: it's a gem.
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Daily Telegraph
Style does not go out of style.
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Jazzwise
A joy from start to finish.
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HMV Choice
Just over an hour of pure class.
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The Herald
A treat of the most sophisticated kind.
more >>

Claire Martin - Live at The Oak Room - Cabaret Scenes


27 May 2009
Cabaret Scenes
Sandi Durell

Claire Martin is one of the best jazz interpreters around. She hails from foggy London town settling into The Oak Room to collaborate with (Sir) Richard Rodney Bennett, pianist extraordinaire. "Witchcraft" concentrates on Cy Coleman's early pop songs in the first half of the show and Ms. Martin obliges that "The Best Is Yet To Come." She sings organically, creating riffs, hills and valleys on the erudite Coleman melodies. She has that I've been around look, creating an impression of nonchalant wisdom. She doesn't rely upon fancy dress and glitter because she only needs one thing: her smoky jazzy colorations.   

Cy Coleman collaborated with a variety of lyricists but his liaison with Carolyn Leigh produced much of the intimate banter for which they are celebrated such as "Rules of the Road" that Ms. Martin sang, Blossom Dearie style, showing off a subtle, amusing personality. A Carmen MacRae fan, the sad "Would You Believe" (lyric:James Lipton) presented prowess as a storyteller as she wailed "you're a big fool as I am.". Martin's exterior easy style gave way on ballad "I'm Gonna Laugh You Right Out of My Life" (lyrics: Joseph Allan McCarthy) with quivering phrasing emphasizing the impact of the lyric she loves so well.

"Nobody Does It Like Me" (lyricist:Dorothy Fields), admittedly not in Martin's jazz comfort zone, was given a humorous version, squeezing out each nuance of lyric and some new ones.


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