Wagstaff: Breathe Freely

Wagstaff: Breathe Freely

Wagstaff: Breathe Freely
Label(s)
Code
CKD 535
Inlay available for download
Booklet available for download
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. Hello? Ritchie? Doctor Ritchie, are you there?
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. Hello? Ritchie? Doctor Ritchie, are you there?

    03:22
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. Kendall, how do you do?
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. Kendall, how do you do?

    01:03
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. You know, I am certain, how my mother country suffers
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. You know, I am certain, how my mother country suffers

    01:31
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. In Scotland there is hope
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. In Scotland there is hope

    02:32
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. Cometh the woman
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. Cometh the woman

    02:22
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. Der kleine Hund
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. Der kleine Hund

    02:53
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act I. This analysis is exemplary
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act I. This analysis is exemplary

    05:45
    $4.80
  • Breathe Freely: Act II. The evening light
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act II. The evening light

    05:00
    $4.80
  • Breathe Freely: Act II. To live is to regret
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act II. To live is to regret

    02:53
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act II. Doctor Hempel, what progress?
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act II. Doctor Hempel, what progress?

    02:29
    $2.40
  • Breathe Freely: Act II. Breathe Freely
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Derek Clark Breathe Freely Ensemble

    Breathe Freely: Act II. Breathe Freely

    04:52
    $2.40
  • A Persistent Illusion: I.
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Pete Furniss: clarinet, Mark Bailey: cello, Andrew Johnston: piano

    A Persistent Illusion: I.

    05:42
    $4.80
  • A Persistent Illusion: II.
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Pete Furniss: clarinet, Mark Bailey: cello, Andrew Johnston: piano

    A Persistent Illusion: II.

    04:48
    $2.40
  • A Persistent Illusion: III.
    Composer(s) Julian Wagstaff
    Artist(s) Pete Furniss: clarinet, Mark Bailey: cello, Andrew Johnston: piano

    A Persistent Illusion: III.

    08:46
    $4.80

Total running time: 53 minutes.

Album information

Breathe Freely is a new opera by contemporary Scottish composer Julian Wagstaff. Written for three singers and piano trio, it is a chamber opera in two acts set in 1943 against the backdrop of the Second World War.

At its heart Julian Wagstaff's opera is a manifold celebration of human endeavour, history, interest, compassion, and, of course, chemistry at the University of Edinburgh. It recounts the semi-fictional story of several real and extraordinary chemists who helped to make the Chemistry department the extraordinary institution it is today: Romantic pragmatist Stanislaw Hempel, endearing perfectionist Chrissie Miller and Professor James Kendall FRS, whose book is the basis for the synopsis.

Breathe Freely was premiered in 2013 to celebrate the tricentenary of the appointment of the first Chair of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh.

Also included on the recording is Wagstaff's piano trio A Persistent Illusion commissioned to celebrate the International Year of Chemistry, 2011. The title refers to Einstein's observation that the distinction between the past, present and future is merely a ‘stubbornly persistent illusion'.